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My current dataset oversampled females to the point that they make up 74% of the total sample size of 411 -- and it should be 50% to 50%. How can I use my post-stratification output to influence my (logistical regression) predictive model?

This is what I did to get the new mean and coefficients of my support when changing the amount of women surveyed:

> library(foreign)
> library(survey)
> 
> mydata <- read.csv("~/Desktop/R/mydata.csv")
> 
> #Enter Actual Population Size
> mydata$fpc <- 1200
> 
> #Enter ID Column Name
> id <- mydata$My.ID
> 
> #Enter Column to Post-Stratify
> type <- mydata$Male
> 
> #Enter Column Variables
> x1 <- 0
> y1 <- 1
> 
> #Enter Corresponding Frequencies
> x2 <- 600
> y2 <- 600
> 
> #Enter the Variable of Interest
> mydata$interest <- mydata$Support
> 
> preliminary.design <- svydesign(id = ~1, data = mydata, fpc = ~fpc)
> 
> ps.weights <- data.frame(type = c(x1,y1), Freq = c(x2, y2))
> 
> mydesign <- postStratify(preliminary.design, ~type, ps.weights)
> 
> #Print Original Mean of Variable of Interest
> mean(mydata$Support)
[1] 0.6666666667
> 
> #Total Actual Population Size
> sum(ps.weights$Freq)
[1] 1200
> 
> #Unweighted Observations Where the Variable of Interest is Not Missing
> unwtd.count(~interest, mydesign)
       counts SE
counts    411  0
> 
> #Print the Post-Stratified Mean and SE of the Variable
> svymean(~interest, mydesign)
               mean      SE
interest 0.71077946 0.01935
> 
> #Print the Weighted Total and SE of the Variable
> svytotal(~interest, mydesign)
             total       SE
interest 852.93535 23.21552
> 
> #Print the Mean and SE of the Interest Variable, by Type
> svyby(~interest, ~type, mydesign, svymean)
  type     interest            se
0    0 0.6196721311 0.02256768435
1    1 0.8018867925 0.03142947839
> 
> mysvyby <- svyby(~interest, ~type, mydesign, svytotal)
> 
> #Print the Coefficients of each Type
> coef(mysvyby)
          0           1 
371.8032787 481.1320755 
> 
> #Print the Standard Error of each Type
> SE(mysvyby)
[1] 13.54061061 18.85768704
> 
> #Print Confidence Intervals for the Coefficient Estimates
> confint(mysvyby)
        2.5 %      97.5 %
0 345.2641696 398.3423878
1 444.1716880 518.0924629

All of the output above seems right -- but I can't figure out how to utilize that data to influence the output of my logistic regression model. This is the code without any post-stratification influence:

> mydata <- read.csv("~/Desktop/R/mydata.csv")
> 
> attach(mydata) 
> 
> # Define variables 
> 
> Y <- cbind(Support)
> X <- cbind(Black, vote, Male) 
> 
> # Descriptive statistics 
> 
> summary(Y) 
    Support         
 Min.   :0.0000000  
 1st Qu.:0.0000000  
 Median :1.0000000  
 Mean   :0.6666667  
 3rd Qu.:1.0000000  
 Max.   :1.0000000  
> 
> summary(X) 
     Black            vote                   Male          
 Min.   :0.0000000   Min.   : 0.8100   Min.   :0.0000000  
 1st Qu.:0.0000000   1st Qu.:24.0350   1st Qu.:0.0000000  
 Median :0.0000000   Median :47.6300   Median :0.0000000  
 Mean   :0.4355231   Mean   :48.0447   Mean   :0.2579075  
 3rd Qu.:1.0000000   3rd Qu.:72.1300   3rd Qu.:1.0000000  
 Max.   :1.0000000   Max.   :91.3200   Max.   :1.0000000  
> 
> table(Y) 
Y
  0   1 
137 274 
> 
> table(Y)/sum(table(Y)) 
Y
           0            1 
0.3333333333 0.6666666667 
> 
> 
> # Logit model coefficients 
> 
> logit<- glm(Y ~ X, family=binomial (link = "logit")) 
> 
> summary(logit) 

Call:
glm(formula = Y ~ X, family = binomial(link = "logit"))

Deviance Residuals: 
       Min          1Q      Median          3Q         Max  
-2.1658288  -1.1277933   0.5904486   0.9190314   1.3256407  

Coefficients:
                  Estimate   Std. Error  z value   Pr(>|z|)    
(Intercept)    0.462496014  0.265017604  1.74515  0.0809584 .  
XBlack         1.329633506  0.244053422  5.44812 5.0904e-08 ***
Xvote         -0.008839950  0.004262016 -2.07412  0.0380678 *  
XMale          0.781144950  0.283218355  2.75810  0.0058138 ** 
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

(Dispersion parameter for binomial family taken to be 1)

    Null deviance: 523.21465  on 410  degrees of freedom
Residual deviance: 469.48706  on 407  degrees of freedom
AIC: 477.48706

Number of Fisher Scoring iterations: 4

> 
> # Logit model odds ratios 
> 
> exp(logit$coefficients) 
  (Intercept)        XBlack Xvote                XMale 
 1.5880327947  3.7796579101  0.9911990073  2.1839713716 

Is there a way to combine these two scripts in R to update my logit model so that it looks at gender as 50/50 instead of 74% female/26% male when I predict?

Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

Since you want to create predictions from your model, here's a possible solution: (1) fit the logistic regression model with the data you have at hand (that is, with 74% female and 26% male) and then (2) extract predicted probabilities from your model setting the gender variable equal to 0.5. See ?predict.glm for more information.

share|improve this answer
    
Do you mean ?predict.svyglm? Just .glm doesn't seem to tell me much -- .svyglm seems more complicated, but what it seems like is necessary. –  Ryan Apr 20 at 20:35
    
If you want to create survey weights (e.g., pweights) and use them in your model, then you should use predict.svyglm. If you want to run your model on the raw data and then predict outcomes -- setting the gender variable to 0.50 -- then you should use predict.glm. –  statsRus Apr 20 at 21:08
    
Thanks! I'll read up more on the difference. Would you mind adding an example of each to your answer? –  Ryan Apr 21 at 3:33

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