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In C++ you can disable a function in parent's class by declaring it as private in the child class. How can this be done in Python? I.E. How can I hide parent's function from child's public interface?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 14 down vote accepted

There really aren't any true "private" attributes or methods in Python. One thing you can do is simply override the method you don't want in the subclass, and raise an exception:

>>> class Foo( object ):
...     def foo( self ):
...     	print 'FOO!'
...     	
>>> class Bar( Foo ):
...     def foo( self ):
...     	raise AttributeError( "'Bar' object has no attribute 'foo'" )
...     
>>> b = Bar()
>>> b.foo()
Traceback (most recent call last):
  File "<interactive input>", line 1, in <module>
  File "<interactive input>", line 3, in foo
AttributeError: 'Bar' object has no attribute 'foo'
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>There really aren't any true "private" attributes or methods in Python. That is why I didn't ask how to make them private, but how to 'remove' them from the interface. Hope that the edited version is more accurate –  bgbg Oct 23 '08 at 23:03
1  
I agree that NotImplementedError is probably the best one to use, but if you really wanted to match not having the inherited method at all, raise AttributeError instead (which is what you'd get if the parent method didn't exist). –  Tony Meyer Oct 24 '08 at 10:37
    
Good point regarding AttributeError. I will update my example. –  kurosch Oct 24 '08 at 15:37
5  
This doesn't do what you want -- an AttributeError will only be raised if the foo method is /invoked/ -- getattr(b, 'foo') still returns a method object (an attribute!). –  cdleary Oct 24 '08 at 23:39
1  
-1 this answer still lets the attribute be accessed. –  JBernardo Apr 21 '13 at 0:57

kurosch's method of solving the problem isn't quite correct, because you can still use b.foo without getting an AttributeError. If you don't invoke the function, no error occurs. Here are two ways that I can think to do this:

import doctest

class Foo(object):
    """
    >>> Foo().foo()
    foo
    """
    def foo(self): print 'foo'
    def fu(self): print 'fu'

class Bar(object):
    """
    >>> b = Bar()
    >>> b.foo()
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    ...
    AttributeError
    >>> hasattr(b, 'foo')
    False
    >>> hasattr(b, 'fu')
    True
    """
    def __init__(self): self._wrapped = Foo()

    def __getattr__(self, attr_name):
        if attr_name == 'foo': raise AttributeError
        return getattr(self._wrapped, attr_name)

class Baz(Foo):
    """
    >>> b = Baz()
    >>> b.foo() # doctest: +ELLIPSIS
    Traceback (most recent call last):
    ...
    AttributeError...
    >>> hasattr(b, 'foo')
    False
    >>> hasattr(b, 'fu')
    True
    """
    foo = property()

if __name__ == '__main__':
    doctest.testmod()

Bar uses the "wrap" pattern to restrict access to the wrapped object. Martelli has a good talk dealing with this. Baz uses the property built-in to implement the descriptor protocol for the attribute to override.

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Well, sure, in my answer it's still "visible", but you can't "use" it per se because it will raise the exception. A valid point, though. –  kurosch Oct 27 '08 at 20:53
1  
+1, what a smart trick to use an "empty" property to "delete" foo method! :D –  MestreLion May 13 '12 at 6:58
    
This will break the class for the use of operators defined on parent because there's no subclassing. Also __getattr__ is slow –  JBernardo Apr 21 '13 at 0:57
class X(object):
    def some_function(self):
        do_some_stuff()

class Y(object):
    some_function = None

This may lead to some nasty and hard to find exceptions being thrown though, so you might try this:

class X(object):
    def some_function(self):
        do_some_stuff()

class Y(object):
    def some_function(self):
        raise NotImplementedError("function some_function not implemented")
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A variation on the answer of kurosch:

class Foo( object ):
    def foo( self ):
        print 'FOO!'

class Bar( Foo ):
    @property
    def foo( self ):
        raise AttributeError( "'Bar' object has no attribute 'foo'" )

b = Bar()
b.foo

This raises an AttributeError on the property instead of when the method is called.

I would have suggested it in a comment but unfortunately do not have the reputation for it yet.

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Will this raise AttributeError if you call getattr(b, "Foo")? Unfotunately I don't have a Python Interpreter here to test it with. –  Adrian Ratnapala Apr 17 at 6:45
    
if you mean getattr(b, 'foo') then yes it will –  John Damen Apr 17 at 7:07
    
Yes, that is what I meant. Although getattr(b, 'Foo') will also give you an Attribute error, so no worries there! –  Adrian Ratnapala Apr 17 at 7:23

This is the cleanest way I know to do it.

Override the methods and have each of the overridden methods call your disabledmethods() method. Like this:

class Deck(list):
...
@staticmethod
    def disabledmethods():
        raise Exception('Function Disabled')
    def pop(self): Deck.disabledmethods()
    def sort(self): Deck.disabledmethods()
    def reverse(self): Deck.disabledmethods()
    def __setitem__(self, loc, val): Deck.disabledmethods()
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