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Here's one way to inherit Child from Parent:

function Parent(a)
{
  this.a = a;
}

Parent.prototype =
{
  constructor: Parent,
  parentValue: 123
};

function Child(a, b)
{
  Parent.call(this, a);
  this.b = b;
}

Child.prototype =
{
  constructor: Child,
  childValue: 456,
  __proto__: Parent.prototype
};

child = new Child(1, 2);

// Logs 1 2 456 123
console.log(child.a, child.b, child.childValue, child.parentValue);

Does this way of inheriting have drawbacks?

The rationale behind this is that I would like to add properties in bulk, e.g. Foo.prototype = { a: 1, b: 2 } and not Foo.prototype.a = 1; Foo.prototype.b = 2;, since the latter is too verbose.

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1  
The main drawback is that __proto__ is not supported in all browsers. Doesn't make sense to use it if you can achieve the same in a cross browser way. –  dfsq Apr 20 '14 at 18:29

1 Answer 1

Is it bad to inherit in JavaScript by putting __proto__?

Yes, because it isn't standard (*). Better use Object.create:

function Parent(a) {
  this.a = a;
}
Parent.prototype.parentValue = 123;
function Child(a, b) {
  Parent.call(this, a);
  this.b = b;
}
Child.prototype = Object.create(Parent.prototype);
Child.prototype.constructor = Child;
Child.prototype.childValue = 456;
var child = new Child(1, 2);
console.log(child.a, child.b, child.childValue, child.parentValue);
    // Logs 1 2 456 123

Or, if you want to support older browsers, instead of Object.create you can use

Child.prototype = new Parent();

Note this approach will cause Child instances to inherit an undefined a property, but since you will create an own property using Parent.call(this, a), it doesn't matter very much.


If you want to avoid verbose Foo.prototype.a = 1; Foo.prototype.b = 2;, you can use an extend function:

function extend(obj, props) {
    for(var i in props) if(props.hasOwnProperty(i))
        obj[i] = props[i];
}
extend(Child.prototype, {
    constructor: Child,
    childValue: 456
});

(*) ES6 includes __proto__ in the (normative) annex for addtional ECMAScript features for Web browsers (note that the specification codifies what is already in implementations), but makes it optional if the ECMAScript host is not a web browser. But MDN says that __proto__ is deprecated.

Alternatively, ES6 introduces Object.setPrototypeOf(), which allows to change the prototype like __proto__, but MDN warns:

Mutating the [[Prototype]] of an object, using either this method or the deprecated Object.prototype.__proto__, is strongly discouraged, because it is very slow and unavoidably slows down subsequent execution in modern JavaScript implementations.

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__proto__ is in the ES6 draft tho –  Casper Beyer Apr 20 '14 at 19:22
    
@CasperVonB According to MDN, ES6 introduces setPrototypeOf, and __proto__ is deprecated. –  Oriol Apr 20 '14 at 19:29
    
Normative draft allows it as part of the object literal enhancements –  Casper Beyer Apr 20 '14 at 19:35
    
Its better to polyfil object.create in older browsers as Google closure has done for many years instead of setting Child prototype to an instance of Parent –  HMR Apr 21 '14 at 1:20

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