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I've got a "live search" box that searches through a HTML table and shows/hides depending on the search query.

This works perfectly fine for smaller tables, however as the table data grows searching becomes extreamly slow.

My code:

   $("#search").keyup(function() {
        var raderna = $("#history tbody tr");
        var value = this.value.toLowerCase().trim();
           if(value.length == 0) {

              raderna.each(function(index) {
            if (index !== 0) {
                $row = $(this);
                    if($row.hasClass("hiddenRow")) {
                        $row.hide();
                    } else {
                        $row.show();
                    }
                }
          });

              return false;
       }
        raderna.each(function (index) {
            $(this).find("td").each(function () {
                var id = $(this).text().toLowerCase().trim();
                var not_found = (id.indexOf(value) == -1);
                $(this).closest('tr').toggle(!not_found);
                return not_found;
            });
        });
    }); 

Any ideas what I could do to speed it up?

share|improve this question
    
Concatenate all the fields of a table row into string and push it into an array.Now you can just loop over this array to search for your string. – Tyranicangel Apr 20 '14 at 18:38
    
If you can use angularjs have a look at it.This process is really simple if you can use ng-repeat with ng-filter. – Tyranicangel Apr 20 '14 at 18:40
    
I second the idea of using a JavaScript object/array to manage the live searching. Working with the DOM is generally a lot slower than directly with variables. Perhaps you could store all the table data in a JSON file, and dynamically generate the table from it on page load? It'll probably be a bit slower to fully load the page, but then you could kill two birds with one stone - a faster lookup, and still have only a single file that needs updating as the contents of the table change. (And I feel JSON is a bit more readable/portable than HTML for this sort of thing.) – Serlite Apr 20 '14 at 18:55
  1. Put var raderna = $("#history tbody tr"); above your keyup event. With every keyup event you are looking in DOM for #history tbody tr so it has a lot useless work to do. You can do this once on page load and keep it in that variable.
  2. You can style class hiddenRow to have display: none and instead of calling $row.hide() and $row.show() you can $row.addClass() or removeClass(). It's quickier to add or remove class than to show or hide elements. Or you can even use toggleClass().
  3. This each:

    $(this).find("td").each(function () {
        var id = $(this).text().toLowerCase().trim();
        var not_found = (id.indexOf(value) == -1);
        $(this).closest('tr').toggle(!not_found);
        return not_found;
    });
    

    can be quickier if you write it like this:

    $(this).find('td').each(function() {
        var $this = $(this),
            id = $this.text().toLowerCase(),
            not_found = (id.indexOf(value) == -1);
        $this.closest('tr').toggle(!not_found);
        return not_found;
    });
    

While I was writing it I saw that @Tyranicangel commented your question and I think that both his suggestions are good. I gave you only small tips for improving performance of your code.

share|improve this answer

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