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The code below is a minimal example of my problem. I created a simple template class containing a fixed-size array, and overloaded the assignment operator to accept any class defining the methods size() and begin() (eg, initializer_lists). I don't understand why g++ is not able to resolve my call to this operator (I'm using gcc 4.6):

***.cpp: In function ‘int main()’:
***.cpp:46:22: error: no match for ‘operator=’ in ‘a = {42, -1.0e+0, 3.14158999999999988261834005243144929409027099609375e+0}’
***.cpp:46:22: note: candidates are:
***.cpp:23:8: note: template<class U> A<T, N>::self& A::operator=(const U&) [with U = U, T = double, unsigned int N = 3u, A<T, N>::self = A<double, 3u>]
***.cpp:8:7: note: A<double, 3u>& A<double, 3u>::operator=(const A<double, 3u>&)
***.cpp:8:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘<brace-enclosed initialiser list>’ to ‘const A<double, 3u>&’
***.cpp:8:7: note: A<double, 3u>& A<double, 3u>::operator=(A<double, 3u>&&)
***.cpp:8:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘<brace-enclosed initialiser list>’ to ‘A<double, 3u>&&’

The first candidate is listed correctly, but there is no error message associated. Here is the code:

#include <iostream>
#include <algorithm>
#include <initializer_list>

// ------------------------------------------------------------------------

template <typename T, unsigned N>
class A
{
public:

    typedef A<T,N> self;

    // Default ctor
    A() {}

    // Copy ctor
    template <typename U>
    A( const U& other ) { operator=(other); }

    // Assignemnt
    template <typename U>
    self& operator= ( const U& other )
    {
        if ( other.size() == N )
            std::copy_n( other.begin(), N, m_data );
            return *this;
    }

    // Display contents
    void print() const
    {
        for ( unsigned i = 0; i < N; ++i )
            std::cout << m_data[i] << " ";
        std::cout << std::endl;
    }

private:
    T m_data[N];
};

// ------------------------------------------------------------------------

int main()
{
    A<double,3> a;
    a = {42,-1.0,3.14159};
    a.print();
}

Does anyone know why this might be ambiguous, or what I did wrong?


Note: Ideally, I would even like to replace the first two lines of my main by a single one A<double,3> a = {42,-1.0,3.14159}; but I'm not sure how, I currently get the following error:

***: In function ‘int main()’:
***:45:34: error: could not convert ‘{42, -1.0e+0, 3.14158999999999988261834005243144929409027099609375e+0}’ from ‘<brace-enclosed initialiser list>’ to ‘A<double, 3u>’
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If you read the C++11 tag wiki it clearly states questions tagged c++11 should also be tagged c++. –  Praetorian Apr 20 '14 at 20:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Unlike auto, where a braced-init-list is deduced as an initializer_list, template argument deduction considers it to be a non-deduced context, unless there exists a corresponding parameter of type initializer_list<T>, in which case the T can be deduced.

From §14.8.2.1/1 [temp.deduct.call] (emphasis added)

Template argument deduction is done by comparing each function template parameter type (call it P) with the type of the corresponding argument of the call (call it A) as described below. If removing references and cv-qualifiers from P gives std::initializer_list<P0> for some P0 and the argument is an initializer list (8.5.4), then deduction is performed instead for each element of the initializer list, taking P0 as a function template parameter type and the initializer element as its argument. Otherwise, an initializer list argument causes the parameter to be considered a non-deduced context (14.8.2.5).

Thus the argument to your operator= is not deduced to be an initializer_list<double>. For the code to work, you must define an operator= that takes an initializer_list argument.

template <typename U>
self& operator= ( const std::initializer_list<T>& other )
{
    if ( other.size() == N )
        std::copy_n( other.begin(), N, m_data );
    return *this;
}
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Thank you, that's the explanation I was asking the others, my mistake is clear now. Thank you very much again :) –  Sh3ljohn Apr 20 '14 at 20:04
    
@Sh3ljohn I saw your comment below juan's answer where you said this is just an example you cooked up, but (without seeing your real implementation) this doesn't look like a very good idea to me either. If you have a class that encapsulates a fixed size array, your copy-constructor/assignment operator should probably only accept another instance containing the same sized array, rather than conditionally copying or throwing exceptions. –  Praetorian Apr 20 '14 at 20:14
    
My "real" code issues an error message and doesn't copy (without exception) if the input container does not have the same size. Does that seem sound to you? –  Sh3ljohn Apr 20 '14 at 20:23

A brace-enclosed initializer list does not necessarily have the type std::initializer_list<T>, so you need to specify that the assignment operator template expects an std::initializer_list:

  template <typename U>
  A& operator=(std::initializer_list<U> other )
  {
    if ( other.size() == N )
      std::copy_n( other.begin(), N, m_data );
    return *this;
  }

or

  A& operator=(std::initializer_list<double> other )
  {
    if ( other.size() == N )
      std::copy_n( other.begin(), N, m_data );
    return *this;
  }

I must say, an assignment operator that silently fails if the sizes don't match doesn't seem like a great idea.

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Same than @ooga, I would be interested to know a little more than what I need to do in order for it to work, would you mind explaining what's happening? For you latter concern, this is a minimal example, my code does not fail silently in this case. –  Sh3ljohn Apr 20 '14 at 20:01
    
@Sh3ljohn I added something at the beginning of my answer. I think the number of cases when a brace enclosed initializer list maps to an std::initializer_list is limited. You have to tell the compiler what you want here. –  juanchopanza Apr 20 '14 at 20:06
1  
Thanks :) I prefer the answer of @Praetorian, the standard explains exactly why this happens, although I'm not sure why they chose to handle it like this. –  Sh3ljohn Apr 20 '14 at 20:09

I'd say it's this:

A<double,3> a;
a = {42,-1.0,3.14159};

You are initializing a with default constructor, and then trying to use initializer list on already initialized object - which complains about lacking of appropriate operator= overload. Instead try:

A<double,3> a = {42,-1.0,3.14159};

EDIT:

You also didn't defined required constructor:

template <typename T, unsigned N>
class A
{
public:
    A(std::initializer_list list) : m_data(list) {}

//...
}
share|improve this answer
    
a = {42,-1.0,3.14159}; is not initializing my object a second time, I'm using the templated assignment operator. For your suggestion, please read the end of my post. –  Sh3ljohn Apr 20 '14 at 19:46
    
... Please read my post in full before your next edit. There is a templated constructor defined, and I am not using this constructor in the first part. –  Sh3ljohn Apr 20 '14 at 19:50
    
No one is able to tell how your code works if you hide important details and then downvote for not knowing them. –  maddening Apr 20 '14 at 19:56
    
Does this : m_data(list) actually work? –  ooga Apr 20 '14 at 19:56
    
Not a perfect source but here en.cppreference.com/w/cpp/utility/initializer_list it works - it only require T to take initializer list as a valid consctructor argument and replacing T x[y] with some std collection T. –  maddening Apr 20 '14 at 19:57

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