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I have seen this syntax in MSDN, but I don't know what it does. Does anyone know?

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9  
Yet, the MSDN documentation mentions it but does not explain it. That is a bad way to tease a knowledge hungry developer. –  Phil Jun 28 '12 at 17:11
    
Yield return eliminates the need for a backing list, that is you don't need to code something like MyList.Add(...) just do yield return .... If you need to break out of the loop prematurely and return the virtual backing list you use yield break; –  The Muffin Man Aug 26 '13 at 21:16

8 Answers 8

up vote 249 down vote accepted

It specifies that an iterator has come to an end. You can think of yield break as return statement which does not return value.

For example, if you define a function as iterator, a body of the function may look like this:

for (int i = 0; i < 5; i++) {
    yield return i;
}

Console.Out.WriteLine("You will see me");

Note that after the loop has completed all cycles, the last line gets executed and you will see the message in your console app.

Or like this with yield break:

int i = 0;
while (true) {
    if (i < 5) {
        yield return i;
    } else {
        // note that i++ will not be executed after this
        yield break;
    }
    i++;
}

Console.Out.WriteLine("Won't see me");

In this case last statement is never executed because we left function early.

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1  
Could it be simply break instead of yield break in your example above? Compiler doesn't complain on that. –  orad Jun 3 at 18:26
3  
@orad a simple break in this case would stop the loop, but it wouldn't abort the method execution, thus the last line would be executed and the "Won't see me text" would actually be seen. –  Damir Zekić Jun 3 at 20:27

Ends an iterator block (e.g. says there are no more elements in the IEnumerable).

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Tells the iterator that it's reached the end.

As an example:

public interface INode
{
    IEnumerable<Node> GetChildren();
}

public class NodeWithTenChildren : INode
{
    private Node[] m_children = new Node[10];

    public IEnumerable<Node> GetChildren()
    {
        for( int n = 0; n < 10; ++n )
        {
            yield return m_children[ n ];
        }
    }
}

public class NodeWithNoChildren : INode
{
    public IEnumerable<Node> GetChildren()
    {
        yield break;
    }
}
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yield basically makes an IEnumerable<T> method behave similarly to a cooperatively (as opposed to preemptively) scheduled thread.

yield return is like a thread calling a "schedule" or "sleep" function to give up control of the CPU. Just like a thread, the IEnumerable<T> method regains controls at the point immediately afterward, with all local variables having the same values as they had before control was given up.

yield break is like a thread reaching the end of its function and terminating.

People talk about a "state machine", but a state machine is all a "thread" really is. A thread has some state (I.e. values of local variables), and each time it is scheduled it takes some action(s) in order to reach a new state. The key point about yield is that, unlike the operating system threads we're used to, the code that uses it is frozen in time until the iteration is manually advanced or terminated.

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The whole subject of iterator blocks is covered well in this free sample chapter from Jon Skeet's book C# in Depth.

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Here http://www.alteridem.net/2007/08/22/the-yield-statement-in-c/ is very good example:

public static IEnumerable<int> Range( int min, int max )
{
   while ( true )
   {
      if ( min >= max )
      {
         yield break;
      }
      yield return min++;
   }
}

and explanation, that if a yield break statement is hit within a method, execution of that method stops with no return. There are some time situations, when you don't want to give any result, then you can use yield break.

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If what you mean by "what does yield break really do", is "how does it work" - See Raymond Chen's blog for details http://blogs.msdn.com/oldnewthing/archive/2008/08/12/8849519.aspx

C# iterators generate some very complicated code.

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9  
Well, they're only complicated if you care about the code they're compiled into. Code that uses them is pretty simple. –  Robert Rossney Oct 24 '08 at 7:38
    
@Robert, that's what I meant so I've updated the answer to include your comment –  Tony Lee Aug 29 '11 at 17:13

The yield keyword is used together with the return keyword to provide a value to the enumerator object. yield return specifies the value, or values, returned. When the yield return statement is reached, the current location is stored. Execution is restarted from this location the next time the iterator is called.

To explain the meaning using an example:

    public IEnumerable<int> SampleNumbers()
    {
        int counter = 0;
        yield return counter;

        counter = counter + 2;

        yield return counter;

        counter = counter + 3;

        yield return counter ;
    }

Values returned when this is iterated are: 0, 2, 5.

It’s important to note that counter variable in this example is a local variable. After the second iteration which returns the value of 2, third iteration starts from where it left before, while preserving the previous value of local variable named counter which was 2.

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6  
You didn't explain what yield break does –  notfed Mar 15 '13 at 2:30
    
I don't think yield return actually supports returning multiple values. Maybe that isn't what you actually meant, but that's how I read it. –  Sam Oct 8 '13 at 3:33

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