Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I understand simple foldr statements like

foldr (+) 0 [1,2,3]

However, I'm having trouble with more complicated foldr statements, namely ones that take 2 parameters in the function, and with / and - computations. Could anyone explain the steps that occur to get these answers?

foldr (\x y -> (x+y)*2) 2 [1,3] = 22

foldr (/) 2 [8,12,24,4] = 8.0

Thanks.

share|improve this question

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The foldr function is defined as follows:

foldr :: (a -> b -> b) -> b -> [a] -> b
foldr _ a []     = a
foldr f a (x:xs) = f x (foldr f a xs)

Now consider the following expression:

foldr (\x y -> (x + y) * 2) 2 [1,3]

We'll give the lambda a name:

f x y = (x + y) * 2

Hence:

foldr f 2 [1,3]
-- is
f 1 (foldr f 2 [3])
-- is
f 1 (f 3 (foldr f 2 []))
-- is
f 1 (f 3 2)
-- is
f 1 10
-- is
22

Similarly:

foldr (/) 2 [8,12,24,4]
-- is
8 / (foldr (/) 2 [12,24,4])
-- is
8 / (12 / (foldr (/) 2 [24,4]))
-- is
8 / (12 / (24 / (foldr (/) 2 [4])))
-- is
8 / (12 / (24 / (4 / (foldr (/) 2 []))))
-- is
8 / (12 / (24 / (4 / 2)))
-- is
8 / (12 / (24 / 2.0))
-- is
8 / (12 / 12.0)
-- is
8 / 1.0
-- is
8.0

Hope that helped.

share|improve this answer

The function argument of a fold always takes two arguments. (+) and (/) are binary functions just like the one in your second example.

Prelude> :t (+)
(+) :: Num a => a -> a -> a

If we rephrase the second example as

foldr f 2 [1,3]
    where
    f x y = (x+y)*2

we can expand the right fold using exactly the same scheme we would use for (+):

foldr f 2 [1,3]
foldr f 2 (1 : 3 : [])
1 `f` foldr f 2 (3 : [])
1 `f` (3 `f` foldr f 2 [])
1 `f` (3 `f` 2)
1 `f` 10
22

It is worth noting that foldr is right-associative, which shows in how the parentheses nest. Conversely, foldl, and its useful cousin foldl', are left-associative.

share|improve this answer

You can think of foldr, maybe, and either as functions that replace the data constructors of their respective types with functions and/or values of your choice:

data Maybe a = Nothing | Just a

maybe :: b -> (a -> b) -> Maybe a -> b
maybe  nothing _just Nothing  = nothing
maybe _nothing  just (Just a) = just a

data Either a b = Left a | Right b

either :: (a -> c) -> (b -> c) -> Either a b -> c
either  left _right (Left  a) = left  a
either _left  right (Right b) = right b

data List a = Cons a (List a) | Empty

foldr :: (a -> b -> b) -> b -> List a -> b
foldr cons empty = loop
  where loop (Cons a as) = cons a (loop as)
        loop Empty       = empty

So in general, you don't really have to think about the recursion involved, just think of it as replacing the data constructors:

foldr f nil (1 : (2 : (3 : []))) == (1 `f` (2 `f` (3 `f` nil)))
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.