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I am trying to implement a queue as a doubly linked list. However, the enqueue function goes into infinite recursion when I try to enqueue a second node, I can't seem to figure out what's causing it.

(defstruct node
  value
  (next nil)
  (previous nil))



(defstruct (queue (:print-function print-queue))
  (first nil)
  (last nil))

(defun print-queue (queue s d)
  (do ((node (queue-first queue) (node-next node)))
      ((null node) (format s "~%"))
      (format s "~A " (node-value node))))

(defun enqueue (data queue)
  (let ((node (make-node :value data)))
    (if (null (queue-first queue))
        (setf (queue-first queue) node (queue-last queue) node)
        (setf (node-previous node) (queue-last queue)
              (node-next (queue-last queue)) node
              (queue-last queue) node))))

EDIT: Problematic test case

(setf queue (make-queue))
(enqueue 3 queue)
(enqueue 4 queue) ; this call never terminates and blows up the stack

The last statement on CLISP causes a * - Program stack overflow. RESET

on SBCL it just goes into an infinite loop and I have to exit SBCL

share|improve this question
    
We can only guess what the problem is, when you are not including how you are using the code and when you are not including the error message. First rule of bug reporting: provide a test case and the error. Lisp implementations also provide a backtrace, which should provide a clue. – Rainer Joswig Apr 21 '14 at 6:39
    
Sorry, I thought it was clear.. I will add the problematic test case. – turingcomplete Apr 21 '14 at 6:45
    
If you provide a test case, my answer will be much shorter. – Rainer Joswig Apr 21 '14 at 6:47
    
Provide the error message, too. Also read it. – Rainer Joswig Apr 21 '14 at 6:48
    
You are right, I should've done that in the first place. I apologize, and thank you for the feedback. – turingcomplete Apr 21 '14 at 6:48
up vote 4 down vote accepted

Well, you still haven't really looked at the error. ;-)

If you use SBCL:

0] backtrace

...
11898: (SB-KERNEL::%DEFAULT-STRUCTURE-PRETTY-PRINT #1=#S(NODE :VALUE 4 :NEXT NIL :PREVIOUS #S(NODE :VALUE 3 :NEXT #1# :PREVIOUS NIL)) #<SYNONYM-STREAM :SYMBOL SB-SYS:*STDOUT* {10001ACA23}>)
11899: ((LABELS SB-IMPL::HANDLE-IT :IN SB-KERNEL:OUTPUT-OBJECT) #<SYNONYM-STREAM :SYMBOL SB-SYS:*STDOUT* {10001ACA23}>)
11900: (PRIN1 #1=#S(NODE :VALUE 4 :NEXT NIL :PREVIOUS #S(NODE :VALUE 3 :NEXT #1# :PREVIOUS NIL)) NIL)
11901: (SB-IMPL::REPL-FUN NIL)
11902: ((LAMBDA NIL :IN SB-IMPL::TOPLEVEL-REPL))
11903: (SB-IMPL::%WITH-REBOUND-IO-SYNTAX #<CLOSURE (LAMBDA NIL :IN SB-IMPL::TOPLEVEL-REPL) {1002ACB00B}>)
11904: (SB-IMPL::TOPLEVEL-REPL NIL)
11905: (SB-IMPL::TOPLEVEL-INIT)
11906: ((FLET #:WITHOUT-INTERRUPTS-BODY-58 :IN SAVE-LISP-AND-DIE))
11907: ((LABELS SB-IMPL::RESTART-LISP :IN SAVE-LISP-AND-DIE))

It's not your function which causes this.

As you can see the error happens in printing the result. You see in the backtrace that the function PRIN1 is used to print a node structure. Your function already returned a result, which now needs to be printed in the REPL.

Your function returns a circular data structure and Lisp tries to print it. Then it goes into an infinite loop.

You need to tell Lisp, that it should deal with circular data structures in the printer.

Use

(setf *print-circle* t)

and try again.

A bit style guide:

  • generally use CLOS classes instead of structures
  • provide a custom printer for each structure, especially those with circularities
  • return meaningful results from functions
share|improve this answer
    
I didn't know that one has to explicitly specify that the printer should deal with recursive structures. One learns something new every day, thanks a lot :). – turingcomplete Apr 21 '14 at 7:43
    
I just realized that an alternative fix was to define a print-node function. – turingcomplete Apr 21 '14 at 8:55
1  
@turingcomplete : yes, see point two in my style guide list – Rainer Joswig Apr 21 '14 at 13:15

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