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Aside: I am using the penn.txt file for the problem. The link here is to my Dropbox but it is also available in other places such as here. However, I've not checked whether they are exactly the same.

Problem statement: I would like to do some word processing on each line of the penn.txt file which contains some words and syntactic categories. The details are not relevant.

Actual "problem" faced: I suspect that the file has some consecutive blank lines (which should ideally not be present), which I think the code verifies but I have not verified it by eye, because the number of lines is somewhat large (~1,300,000). So I would like my Java code and conclusions checked for correctness.

I've used slightly modified version of the code for converting file to String and counting number of lines in a string. I'm not sure about efficiency of splitting but it works well enough for this case.

File file = new File("final_project/penn.txt"); //location
System.out.println(file.exists());

//converting file to String 
byte[] encoded = null;
try { 
    encoded = Files.readAllBytes(Paths.get("final_project/penn.txt"));
} catch (IOException e1) {
// TODO Auto-generated catch block
e1.printStackTrace();
}
String mystr = new String(encoded, StandardCharsets.UTF_8);

//splitting and checking "consecutiveness" of \n    
for(int j=1; ; j++){
    String split = new String();
    for(int i=0; i<j; i++){
        split = split + "\n";
    }
    if(mystr.split(split).length==1) break;
    System.out.print("("+mystr.split(split).length + "," + j + ") ");
}

//counting using Scanner
int count=0;
try {
    Scanner reader = new Scanner(new FileInputStream(file));
        while(reader.hasNext()){
            count++;
            String entry = reader.next();
            //some word processing here
        }
    reader.close();
} catch (FileNotFoundException e) {
e.printStackTrace();
}
System.out.println(count);

The number of lines in Gedit--if I understand correctly--matched the number of \n characters found at 1,283,169. I have verified (separately) that the number of \r and \r\n (combined) characters is 0 using the same splitting idea. The total splitting output is shown below:

(1283169,1) (176,2) (18,3) (13,4) (11,5) (9,6) (8,7) (7,8) (6,9) (6,10) (5,11) (5,12) (4,13) (4,14) (4,15) (4,16) (3,17) (3,18) (3,19) (3,20) (3,21) (3,22) (3,23) (3,24) (3,25) (2,26) (2,27) (2,28) (2,29) (2,30) (2,31) (2,32) (2,33) (2,34) (2,35) (2,36) (2,37) (2,38) (2,39) (2,40) (2,41) (2,42) (2,43) (2,44) (2,45) (2,46) (2,47) (2,48) (2,49) (2,50)

Please answer whether the following statements are correct or not:

  1. From this, what I understand is that there is one instance of 50 consecutive \n characters and because of that there are exactly two instances of 25 consecutive \n characters and so on.
  2. The last count (using Scanner) reading gives 1,282,969 which is an exact difference of 200. In my opinion, what this means is that there are exactly 200 (or 199?) empty lines floating about somewhere in the file.

Is there any way to separately verify this "discrepancy" of 200? (something like a set-theoretic counting of intersections maybe)

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A partial answer to question (the last part) is as follows:

(Assuming the two statements in the question are true)

If instead of printing number of split parts, if you print no. of occurrences of \n j times, you'll get (simply doing a -1):

(1283168,1) (175,2) (17,3) (12,4) (10,5) (8,6) (7,7) (6,8) (5,9) (5,10) (4,11) (4,12) (3,13) (3,14) (3,15) (3,16) (2,17) (2,18) (2,19) (2,20) (2,21) (2,22) (2,23) (2,24) (2,25) (1,26) (1,27) (1,28) (1,29) (1,30) (1,31) (1,32) (1,33) (1,34) (1,35) (1,36) (1,37) (1,38) (1,39) (1,40) (1,41) (1,42) (1,43) (1,44) (1,45) (1,46) (1,47) (1,48) (1,49) (1,50)

Note that for j>3, product of both numbers is <=50, which is your maximum. What this means is that there is a place with 50 consecutive \n characters and all the hits you are getting from 4 to 49 are actually part of the same.

However for 3, the maximum multiple of 3 less than 50 is 48 which gives 16 while you have 17 occurrences here. So there is an extra \n\n\n somewhere with non-\n character on both its 'sides'.

Now for 2 (\n\n), we can subtract 25 (coming from the 50 \ns) and 1 (coming from the separate \n\n\n) to obtain 175-26 = 149.

Counting for the discrepancy, we should sum (2-1)*149 + (3-1)*1 + (50-1)*1, the -1 coming because first \n in each of these is accounted for in the Scanner counting. This sum is 200.

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