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Guys I have three tables in SQL database. tblTicketDetail, tblEngineer and tblTicket_Engineer (a junction table for many-to-many relationship). What happens in my app is, when I generate a new ticket, the ticket is assigned to either one, two or three (max) engineers (thus the many-to-many relationship).

Following is the structure of tables :

tblTicketDetail

+----------+---------------+--------+ | TicketID | Desc | Status | +----------+---------------+--------+ | 1 | Description 1 | 1 | | 2 | Description 2 | 0 | | 3 | Description 3 | 1 | +----------+---------------+--------+

tblEngineer

+------------+-------+ | EngineerID | Name | +------------+-------+ | 1 | Tom | | 2 | Harry | | 3 | John | +------------+-------+

tblTicket_Engineer

+----------+------------+ | TicketID | EngineerID | +----------+------------+ | 1 | 1 | | 1 | 2 | | 1 | 3 | | 2 | 1 | | 3 | 1 | | 3 | 2 | +----------+------------+

Now what I want to do is COUNT all TicketID which have the status of 1 and where the EngineerID should be specific (like for example 1). I tried this query, but it generates two counts

SELECT  (
          SELECT COUNT(*) total
          FROM   tblTicketDetail WHERE Status = 1
        ) AS count1,
        (
          SELECT COUNT(*) total
          FROM   tblTicket_Engineer WHERE EngineerID = 1
        ) AS count2

In this case (where EngineerID = 1), the query should generate the count of 2. How should I go about doing that?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

You need to create a join on your sub-query to get the ticket status and the sub-query should look like below:

      SELECT COUNT(*) total
      FROM   tblTicket_Engineer
      INNER JOIN  tblTicketDetail ON tblTicketDetail.TicketID = tblTicket_Engineer.TicketID AND tblTicketDetail.Status = 1
      WHERE tblTicket_Engineer.EngineerID = 1
share|improve this answer
    
He doesn't need two counts, so he doesn't need this as the subquery. Although it should otherwise be fine. – Clockwork-Muse Apr 21 '14 at 10:20
    
This is working as per my requirement! Much appreciated. – NewbieProgrammer Apr 21 '14 at 10:25
    
@Clockwork-Muse just misunderstood the question as have suggested myself by the provided snippet that the op needs a count for all the tickets with status = 1 and then another count with engineer = 1. You are right there is no need for sub-query. – Dimt Apr 21 '14 at 10:35
    
@NewbieProgrammer Thanks for editing the answer :) – Dimt Apr 21 '14 at 10:36

I think below code will help you

SELECT Count(*) FROM 
tblTicket inner join tblTicket_Engineer on 
(tblTicket.TicketID= tblTicket_Engineer.TicketID)
WHERE  tblTicket.Status = '1' 
AND tblTicket_Engineer.EngineerID = '1'
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, although I'd probably move tblTicket_Engineer.EngineerID = '1' into the join conditions. – Clockwork-Muse Apr 21 '14 at 10:19
    
Why are you using JOIN on two different IDs in the same table? tblTicket_Engineer.EngineerID = tblTicket_Engineer.TicketID. – NewbieProgrammer Apr 21 '14 at 10:30

can you please try this query

SELECT COUNT(tblTicketDetail.TicketID) FROM tblTicketDetail 
JOIN tblTicket_Engineer ON  tblTicket_Engineer.TicketID = tblTicketDetail.TicketID    
WHERE tblTicket_Engineer.EngineerID = 1
AND tblTicketDetail.Status = 1
share|improve this answer
    
This query is also working as per requirement after tweaking a little bit! Thank you for your answer Khushbu! – NewbieProgrammer Apr 21 '14 at 10:43

You could do this

SELECT COUNT(*) total
FROM   tblTicketDetail a, tblTicket_Engineer b
WHERE  a.TicketID = b.TicketID AND a.Status = 1 AND b.EngineerID = 1
share|improve this answer
    
You don't strictly need tblEngineer for this query. And please, avoid the implicit-join syntax (comma-separated FROM clause) in favor of explicit joins. – Clockwork-Muse Apr 21 '14 at 10:18
    
Working perfectly. Much appreciated!! – NewbieProgrammer Apr 21 '14 at 10:45

Try this ,this may help you.

SELECT COUNT(*) total 
FROM tblTicketDetail as td, tblTicket_Engineer as te 
WHERE td.Status = 1 
      AND te.EngineerID = 1;
share|improve this answer
    
Nope, the result is 24 when the above query is executed. – NewbieProgrammer Apr 21 '14 at 9:58
    
You're heading in the right direction, but you've forgotten one important part - you need to tie engineers to the tickets they're working on! This is why the recommendation is to not use the implicit-join syntax (comma-separated FROM clause), in favor of explicitly listing your joins - it tends to make this problem more obvious. – Clockwork-Muse Apr 21 '14 at 10:22

You may want to use a JOIN:

  SELECT COUNT(*) total
  FROM   tblTicket NATURAL JOIN tblTicket_Engineer NATURAL JOIN tblEngineer
  WHERE  Status = 1 AND EngineerID = 1

In case your database engine does not support multiple NATURAL JOIN clauses, or you don't want to use them, you may resort to an explicit JOIN

  SELECT COUNT(*) total
  FROM   tblTicket INNER JOIN tblTicket_Engineer ON (TicketID)
         INNER JOIN tblEngineer ON (EngineedID)
  WHERE  Status = 1 AND EngineerID = 1

NOTE Do not use NATURAL JOIN in production environments. See this post.

share|improve this answer
    
Generates an error about using multiple NATURAL JOIN. – NewbieProgrammer Apr 21 '14 at 10:04
    
Then the problem is not generically related to SQL, but to a specific implementation. Which is your RDBMS? – Roberto Reale Apr 21 '14 at 10:06
    
SQL server 2012 – NewbieProgrammer Apr 21 '14 at 10:22
1  
Personally, I'd avoid the use of NATURAL JOIN in any production database, because there are often columns that shouldn't be joined, that should still have the same name - createdOn audit timestamp columns, any sort of status column, the list goes on. Add in the many times that the columns you may want to join won't have the same name - eg employeeId <-> createdBy audit column - and it doesn't appear that useful. – Clockwork-Muse Apr 21 '14 at 10:30

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