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I've written my own Tree class which includes Enumerable. Tree then provides an #each function. As a consequence, it is able to automatically acquire all the Enumerable functions like #map, #select, #find, et cetera. This all works in my code so far.

Here's the problem. When I wrote #each for my Tree, I gave #each an argument which is the name of the tree traversal algorithm to use, such as :pre_order or :breadth_first. But now when I call #map or #inject or #any? et cetera, it can only use the default traversal algorithm. Is there any way I can pass this argument through the other Enumerable functions? Here are my criteria;

  • I need to be able to use any traversal algorithm for any Enumerable function. This is very important because trees can have very different performance for different algorithms.
  • I don't want to rewrite every single Enumerable function to pass this argument to #each; that defeats the purpose of the module.

Here's an abbreviated version of my code;

class Tree
  include Enumerable
  ...

  # Overwrite #each, and give it the algorithm argument.
  def each(algorithm = :pre_order, &block)
    if TRAVERSAL_ALGORITHMS.include? algorithm
      self.send(algorithm, &block)
    else
      self.method_missing(algorithm)
    end
  end

  def pre_order(&block)
    yield self
    self.branches.each do |branch|
      branch.pre_order(&block)
    end
  end

  def post_order(&block)
    ...
  end

  def breadth_first(&block)
    ...
  end

end

I want to call things like this;

tree.find(13, :breadth_first)
tree.any?(:post_order) do |node|
  node.root >= 10
end
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2  
What if instead of passing an argument to each, you had methods for the algorithms which returned Enumerable wrappers of the original tree with each algorithm? E.g. tree.breadth_first.find(13) Or is the goal to implement as an argument? –  Charlie Apr 21 at 12:38
    
That's an excellent idea. Can you write it up as an answer? –  Alex Altair Apr 21 at 12:40
    
Done. :-) See below. –  Empact Apr 21 at 12:50
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I am so silly.

The method #enum_for gives me all the power here. I can implement Charlie's syntax of

tree.breadth_first.find(13)

by adding the conventional line

return self.enum_for(__method__) unless block_given?

in each of my traversal methods. The tree.breadth_first will return an Enumerator which enumerates according to the breadth-first algorithm; any Enumerable method called on that will use that enumeration internally.

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Ha - totally forgot about enum_for. –  Empact Apr 24 at 13:30
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Possible answer: set an instance variable for which algorithm to use. The code would then look like this;

class Tree
  include Enumerable
  attr_accessor :traversal_algorithm

  def initialize(...)
    @traversal_algorithm = :pre_order
    ...
  end

  ...

  def each(&block)
    if TRAVERSAL_ALGORITHMS.include? @algorithm
      self.send(@algorithm, &block)
    else
      self.method_missing(@algorithm)
    end
  end

end

and the algorithm would be set like this;

tree.traversal_algorithm = :breadth_first
tree.find(13)

tree.traversal_algorithm = :post_order
tree.any? do |node|
  node.root >= 10
end

This seems like a possibly terrible idea.

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1  
It would make more sense if you make this part of your question, like "I have come up with this so far, but it seems terrible", instead of posting it as an answer to your question. You can edit your question & delete this answer to do that still. –  Daniël Knippers Apr 21 at 12:40
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I would follow Charlie's suggestion and use proxy objects:

class Tree
  class PreOrderEnumerator
    include Enumerable

    attr_reader :tree

    def initialize(tree)
      @tree = tree
    end

    def each(&block)
      yield tree
      tree.branches.each do |branch|
        branch.pre_order(&block)
      end
    end
  end

  def pre_order
    PreOrderEnumerator.new(self)
  end
end

Which you can then use like so:

tree.pre_order.any? {|node| node.root > 10 }
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