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I have a List of CARS and I display the list in a Listbox using an overridded ToString method. I have derived classes for models of cars(eg hatchback), I need to display more information about the derived car models without loosing the base tostring method.

How can I display the CARS list in one listbox and the "hatchback" details in a different listbox.

If I override the ToString in the Models class it overrides the details I'm trying to display for CARS also.

Thanks Sorry, C# My Cars method is

public override string ToString()
    {
        return Name + " [" + this.GetType().Name.ToString() + "] called " + Type;
    }

But when I create a derived class I sometimes want to use the ToString from the derived class and not always the one from the base class.

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2  
which language? –  dognose Apr 21 '14 at 12:41
    
Can you tag this with the respective language and post the code you've tried? –  Jimmy Smith Apr 21 '14 at 13:01
1  
"sometimes" when? Under what conditions? –  D Stanley Apr 21 '14 at 14:07
    
can you not just call base.ToString in the derived classes and put the logic in the derived implementation code? –  im so confused Apr 21 '14 at 17:04

1 Answer 1

The short answer is that you can't do what you've described. Once you've overridden a virtual method in a derived class you cannot access the version in the base class from the derived class.

I would consider adding a new method or property to the derived class for retrieving hatchback-specific information.

class Car
{
    public override string ToString()
    {
        return "some basic info"; // Whatever you want
    }
}

class Hatchback : Car
{
     public string HatchbackInfo
     {
         get{return "some hatchback info";}  // Return some details only hatchbacks have
     }
}

When consuming a collection of Car objects that could actually be hatchbacks you can check the type of the object and act accordingly:

public void DoSomeStuffWithCars(List<Car> cars)
{
      foreach(Car c in cars)
      {
          Hatchback h = c as Hatchback.
          if(h != null)  // alternatively you can use the 'is' operator
          {
               // do some hatchback stuff with h.HatchbackInfo
          } 
          // logic here applies to all cars
      }
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 Behaviour which varies according to which derived type the object is should be in virtual methods. –  ClickRick Apr 21 '14 at 14:16
    
@ClickRick: The OP didn't ask for a behavior that varied according to derived type. They asked for a way to associate information specifically with a derived type only. –  Odrade Apr 21 '14 at 14:22

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