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I have a recursive nodes that I'm trying to set up for jquery-checktree. The nodes look like

foo/bar/ID
       /NAME
       /CHECKED
       bar/ID
          /NAME
          /CHECKED
   /bar/ID
       /NAME
   /bar/ID
       /NAME
       /bar/ID
           /NAME
           /CHECKED
           /bar/ID
               /NAME
               /CHECKED

Where any bar may or may not have one or more bar nodes below it, but any bar will have ID and NAME and might have a CHECKED.

and I want to turn that into

<ul>
  <li><input type="checkbox" name="..." value="..." checked="checked"></input>
      <label for="...">...</label>
      <ul>
        <li><input type="checkbox" name="..." value="..." checked="checked"></input>
          <label for="...">...</label>
        </li>
      </ul>
  <li>....</li>
</ul>

I can get the first level by doing:

    <ul class="tree">
    <xsl:for-each select="/foo/bar/">
        <li><input type="checkbox" name="{ID}" value="{ID}">
            <xsl:if test="CHECKED = 'Y'"><xsl:attribute name="checked">checked</xsl:attribute></xsl:if>
            </input><label for="{ID}"><xsl:value-of select="NAME"/></label>
        </li>
    </xsl:for-each>
    </ul>

But I don't know how to recurse down to the embedded "bar" within the "bar", down to however many levels there might be.

share|improve this question
    
@Paul: Resist the urge to use <xsl:for-each>. Most of the time it stands in the way of an elegant solution. Try to get things done with <xsl:apply-templates> instead, not only does this reduce the nesting complexity of your stylesheet, it also enables you to produce a content-driven transformation, as opposed to an iterative/imperative approach. –  Tomalak Feb 23 '10 at 17:33
    
@Tomalak: I mostly agree - if you can, template matching delivers the clearest design. But I find I can't always use match in a straightforward way to solve my own problems. But in this case, I agree completely, match is better than for-each + call –  Roland Bouman Feb 23 '10 at 17:43

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here's one way:

<xsl:template match="bar">
    <li>
        <input type="checkbox" name="{ID}" value="{ID}">
            <xsl:if test="CHECKED = 'Y'">
                <xsl:attribute name="checked">checked</xsl:attribute>
            </xsl:if>
        </input>
        <label for="{ID}"><xsl:value-of select="NAME"/></label>
        <!-- 

            If we have bar children, make a list and recurse

        -->
        <xsl:if test="bar">
            <ul>
                <xsl:apply-templates select="bar"/>
            </ul>
        </xsl:if>
    </li>
</xsl:template>

This relies on the "automatic" template matching. To ensure the matching takes place, you could either put a <xsl:apply-templates/> inside the <xsl:for-each> loop of your original code, however, you can even improve it all and replace that original code with this template:

<xsl:template match="/foo">
   <ul class="tree">
       <xsl:apply-templates select="bar"/>
   </ul>
</xsl:template>

If you want more control, you can also use <xsl:for-each select="bar"> and call a named template (<xsl:template name="some-name">... and <xsl:call-template>) inside the loop. See: http://www.w3.org/TR/xslt#named-templates

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Flawless solution. –  Tomalak Feb 23 '10 at 17:29
    
It doesn't seem to be finding the first "bar". –  Paul Tomblin Feb 23 '10 at 17:43
    
Thanks, Tomalak :) –  Roland Bouman Feb 23 '10 at 17:44
    
Also, how do I get the first <ul></ul>? –  Paul Tomblin Feb 23 '10 at 17:45
1  
Paul: xslt is hard and simple at the same time...it's hard to explain. Don't let it get you down, it may take some time to grok it, but once you do, it can make some terribly complicated things extremely simple. Unfortunately it makes some other things that should be simple terribly complicated, but that's another story :) –  Roland Bouman Feb 23 '10 at 17:52

This is an example (proof of concept, actually) for a completely input-driven, push-style solution (template matching only, no conditionals, no named templates):

<xsl:stylesheet 
  version="1.0" 
  xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform" 
>

  <xsl:template match="*[bar]">
    <ul class="tree">
      <xsl:apply-templates select="bar" mode="li" />
    </ul>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="bar" mode="li">
    <li>
      <xsl:apply-templates select="." mode="checkbox" />
      <xsl:apply-templates select="(.)[bar]" />
    </li>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="bar" mode="checkbox">
    <input type="checkbox" id="{ID}" name="{NAME}">
      <xsl:apply-templates select="CHECKED" />
    </input>
    <label for="{ID}">
      <xsl:value-of select="NAME" />
    </label>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="CHECKED">
    <xsl:attribute name="checked">checked</xsl:attribute>
  </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

When applied to this input XML (extrapolated from your question):

<foo>
  <bar>
    <ID>nd1</ID>
    <NAME>Node 1</NAME>
    <CHECKED />
    <bar>
      <ID>nd2</ID>
      <NAME>Node 2</NAME>
      <CHECKED />
    </bar>
  </bar>
  <bar>
    <ID>nd3</ID>
    <NAME>Node 3</NAME>
  </bar>
  <bar>
    <ID>nd4</ID>
    <NAME>Node 4</NAME>
    <bar>
      <ID>nd5</ID>
      <NAME>Node 5</NAME>
      <CHECKED />
      <bar>
        <ID>nd6</ID>
        <NAME>Node 6</NAME>
        <CHECKED />
      </bar>
    </bar>
  </bar>
</foo>

It produces this output:

<ul class="tree">
  <li>
    <input type="checkbox" id="nd1" name="Node 1" checked="checked" />
    <label for="nd1">Node 1</label>
    <ul class="tree">
      <li>
        <input type="checkbox" id="nd2" name="Node 2" checked="checked" />
        <label for="nd2">Node 2</label>
      </li>
    </ul>
  </li>
  <li>
    <input type="checkbox" id="nd3" name="Node 3" />
    <label for="nd3">Node 3</label>
  </li>
  <li>
    <input type="checkbox" id="nd4" name="Node 4" />
    <label for="nd4">Node 4</label>
    <ul class="tree">
      <li>
        <input type="checkbox" id="nd5" name="Node 5" checked="checked" />
        <label for="nd5">Node 5</label>
        <ul class="tree">
          <li>
            <input type="checkbox" id="nd6" name="Node 6" checked="checked" />
            <label for="nd6">Node 6</label>
          </li>
        </ul>
      </li>
    </ul>
  </li>
</ul>
share|improve this answer
    
Cool! thanks for sharing :) –  Roland Bouman Feb 23 '10 at 21:18

<xsl:template match="foo">
    <ul class="tree">
        <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </ul>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="bar" name="wunderbar">
<!-- we want to match all bars, not only /foo/bars -->
    <li>
        <input type="checkbox" name="{ID}" value="{ID}">
        <xsl:if test="CHECKED = 'Y'"><xsl:attribute name="checked">checked</xsl:attribute></xsl:if>
        </input><label for="{ID}">
            <xsl:value-of select="NAME"/>
        </label>
        <!-- If there is some bar, the next template is applied -->
        <xsl:apply-templates/>
    </li>
</xsl:template>

<xsl:template match="bar/bar">
<!-- Just adds <ul> around bar included in bar and calls the usual template -->
    <ul>
        <xsl:call-template name="wunderbar"/>
    </ul>
</xsl:template>

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