Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following code, does this run an endless loop?
I am trying to schedule something every minute and the console application should run continuously until I close it.

class Program
{
  static int curMin;
  static int lastMinute = DateTime.Now.AddMinutes(-1).Minutes;

 static void Main(string[] args)
 {
   // Not sure about this line if it will run continuously every minute??
   System.Threading.Timer timer = new System.Threading.Timer(new TimerCallback(TimCallBack), null, 1000, 60000);

  Console.Read();
  timer.Dispose();
 }
   private static void TimCallBack(object o)
   {
      curMin = DateTime.Now.Minute;
      if (lastMinute < curMin)
      {
          // Do my work every minute
          lastMinute = curMin;
      }
    }

}
share|improve this question
    
Its meant to test a few things, so adding to Widows task scheduler or creating a windows service is not an option. –  Picflight Feb 23 '10 at 17:40
    
What happens when "curMin" becomes 59? Also, isn't it fairly easy to just run the code and observe what it does? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Feb 23 '10 at 22:19
    
Instead of using System.Threading.Timer you can use System.Timers.Timer (msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.timers.timer.aspx) which according to msdn "has more features". It has somewhat of the same example you have posted here. –  Patrick Feb 23 '10 at 22:43

6 Answers 6

up vote 10 down vote accepted

KISS - or are you competing for the Rube Goldberg award? ;-)

static void Main(string[] args)
{
   while(true)
   {
     DoSomething();
     if(Console.KeyAvailable)
     {
        break;     
     }
     System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(60000);
   }
}
share|improve this answer

I think your method should work assuming you don't press any keys on the console window. The answer above will definitely work but isn't the prettiest.

share|improve this answer

As soon as your main() exits, all the other threads will be automatically closed, too.

share|improve this answer
    
Does that mean the timer is designed properly? –  Picflight Feb 23 '10 at 17:38
    
If you want a thread that doesn't close when the main thread exits, you'll have to create a new Thread(myMethod) and set its thread.IsBackground = false. It will then have its fair chance of exiting as well. –  Patrick Feb 24 '10 at 9:42

If it needs to run the whole time, might it be a better solution to create a service? Example here.

share|improve this answer

Why not add your application to the Windows Task scheduler and do just one "task" per startup of your console app (and don't bother thinking about scheduling yourself?)

And to answer your question: No your sample doesn't "Loop", it's event driven and will close on key press.

share|improve this answer
    
Its meant to test a few things, so adding to Widows task scheduler or creating a windows service is not an option. –  Picflight Feb 23 '10 at 17:40

Using an event which times out for the stop might work, something like this:

class Program
{
    static TimeSpan _timeSpan = new TimeSpan(0, 0, 5);
    static ManualResetEvent _stop = new ManualResetEvent(false);

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Console.TreatControlCAsInput = false;
        Console.CancelKeyPress += delegate (object sender, ConsoleCancelEventArgs e)
        { 
            _stop.Set();
            e.Cancel = true;
        };

        while (!_stop.WaitOne(_timeSpan))
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Waiting...");
        }
        Console.WriteLine("Done.");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
@avid, how does 'something like this' address the question in ANY way? I am sorry, I don't see it. The OP is obviously overcomplicating the situation and you have taken it even farther but have failed to demonstrate 'Scheduling something to run every minute'. sorry.. fail –  Sky Sanders Feb 23 '10 at 22:07

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.