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SOLVED: Andy Lester pointed my to the right direction, it was due to poor index definitions.

There is a part of a query which is causing my a lot of trouble:

 SELECT i.id
 FROM items AS i
 LEFT JOIN tag_rel as tr2 ON (tr2.item = i.id)
 LEFT JOIN tags  AS t2 ON (t2.id = tr2.tag)
 WHERE t2.name LIKE 'chocolate'
 GROUP BY i.id

items is the "items table

tag_rel is the relationship between the item and the tag

tags contains the name of the tag

So the query above works fine, as it should: it returns the items tagged as chocolate

But here is what im doing which slows the query down a lot (10 seconds+) so I'm guessing I'm doing something wrong :-/

 SELECT i.id
 FROM items AS i
 LEFT JOIN tag_rel as tr2 ON (tr2.item = i.id)
 LEFT JOIN tags AS t2 ON (t2.id = tr2.tag AND t2.sec_corrected = 0)
 LEFT JOIN tags AS t3 ON (t3.sec_corrected = tr2.tag AND t3.sec_corrected > 0)
 WHERE (t2.name LIKE 'choclate' OR t3.name LIKE 'choclate')
 GROUP BY i.id

sec_corrected is a column in the "tags" table which contains the id of another tag, ie:

Tags table structure:
id 1   name choclate   sec_corrected 2
id 2   name chocolate   sec_corrected 0

Just to clarify, i want get the "items" which are tagged as"chocolate" if the user searches for either "chocolate" or "choclate", since "choclate" has been corrected as "chocolate".

I have also tried with only one LEFT JOIN but it's still slow:

 SELECT i.id
 FROM items AS i
 LEFT JOIN tag_rel as tr2 ON (tr2.item = i.id)
 LEFT JOIN tags AS t2 ON (t2.id = tr2.tag OR t2.sec_corrected = tr2.tag)
 WHERE (t2.name LIKE 'choclate')
 GROUP BY i.id

Any ideas?

Thank you so much!

share|improve this question
1  
can you use explain {your query} and share the result ? –  Abhik Chakraborty Apr 21 at 14:57
    
WHERE (t2.name LIKE 'choclate' OR t3.name LIKE 'choclate')?? why not use Wild card to do the search for starters for example WHERE (t2.name LIKE 'choclate%' OR t3.name LIKE 'choclate%') or WHERE (t2.name LIKE '%cho%' OR t3.name LIKE '%cho%') sounds like you need to read up more on how to sturcutre a query and how to use Joins –  DJ KRAZE Apr 21 at 14:59
    
I think they should be full joins in the first query - your WHERE clause requires the right-most table to be present anyway. –  halfer Apr 21 at 14:59
    
It's probably not relevant to your issue but using LIKE as synonym for = leads to fairly confusing code. –  Álvaro G. Vicario Apr 21 at 15:01
1  
THanks @AndyLester it was all about cleaning up the indixes :) –  James Apr 21 at 22:25

1 Answer 1

Without the explain it is a bit Try-And-Error, but normally with a simple "OR" clause you can block the index usage. LIKE is overkill, use "=" when no pattern is given.

Simple solution is to split it into two INNER JOINs with a union. Ugly, but often helpful.

SELECT i.id
FROM items AS i
INNER JOIN tag_rel as tr2 ON (tr2.item = i.id)
INNER JOIN tags AS t2 ON (t2.id = tr2.tag AND t2.sec_corrected = 0)
WHERE (t2.name = 'choclate')

UNION
SELECT i.id
FROM items AS i
INNER JOIN tag_rel as tr2 ON (tr2.item = i.id)
INNER JOIN tags AS t3 ON (t3.sec_corrected = tr2.tag AND t3.sec_corrected > 0)
WHERE (t3.name = 'choclate')

that could help a lot.

share|improve this answer
    
Hey, thanks for your answery! Yeah, I'm actually using LIKE '$search%'. Do you know if there is any alternative to UNION? Because my query is actually quite extense... is there an equivalent to UNION for two LEFT JOINs? –  James Apr 21 at 15:24
    
This fruit is sour, I know. The only way is using dynamic Query parts for composing the two halfs of the query. Just try it with pure SQL-Text, maybe you are lucky and it doesn't help in your scenario. Just add the explains, if that is not the solution. But real LEFT JOINS are slower. –  flaschenpost Apr 21 at 15:31

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