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Suppose you have an array p:

p=[['0', '9', '10', '13'], ['1', '8', '10', '14'], 
   ['2', '7', '9', '15'], ['3', '2', '8',  '18'], 
   ['4', '1', '7', '19'], ['5', '1', '2', '20'], 
   ['6', '2', '4', '21'], ['7', '1', '3',  '22'], 
   ['8', '4', '6', '25'], ['9', '3', '5', '26'], 
   ['10', '5', '6', '27'], ['11', '8', '10', '28'],
   ['12', '7', '9', '31'], ['13', '1', '2', '32'], 
   ['14', '4', '6', '33'], ['15', '3', '5', '34']]

I am interested in knowing the indexes of elements based on a partial string that should always match with elements in p at positions [1] and [2] (In p that would be 9,10, 8,10, 7,9, 2,8 etc). For example, I would like to know the indexes of elements containing the partial string '1','2'. In such case, the indexes should be: [5,13] that corresponds to elements:

    ['5', '1', '2', '20']
    ['13', '1', '2', '32']

I found this related question in stackoverflow: python - find index postion in list based of partial string. However, when I have tried with only 2 as the partial string I have got the following result (which is perfect):

    >>> indices = [i for i, s in enumerate(p) if '2' in s]
    >>> indices
     [2, 3, 5, 6, 13]
    >>> 

But then, if I try with ('1','2') I get nothing:

    >>> indices = [i for i, s in enumerate(p) if ('1','2') in s]
    >>> indices
     []

How should I write the partial string in the if so that this code work?. I really don't understand why it is not working. I'd be happy if somebody could help me to understand this. I have tried: putting the partial string between [], define it as an array before the conditional and that doesn't work either. Is there another way to accomplish the same task?, because I am aware that the mere use of the code presented in the link mentioned above does not search matches in positions [1] and [2].

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

You need something like this:

indices = [i for i, s in enumerate(p) if ('1','2') == (s[1],s[2])]

In your list comprehension, each s is an array of strings, and the if statement is checking whether a tuple of two strings is contained in that list, which always evaluates to false.

>>> '2' in ['5', '1', '2', '20']
True
>>> ('1', '2') in ['5', '1', '2', '20']
False
>>> ['1', '2'] in ['5', '1', '2', '20']
False

This is why the resulting indices is empty.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @YS-L this worked. Thanks for the explanation as well. – muammar Apr 22 '14 at 7:35
    
@muammar No problem. You can consider closing this question by accepting the answer if it helps. – YS-L Apr 22 '14 at 9:21

you need to use itertool.combinations like in this example:

import itertools

indices = [i for i, s in enumerate(p) if ('1', '2') in list(itertools.combinations(s, 2))]
print indices

and the output will be :

[5, 13]

knowing that using listover itertools uses lots of memory if you have big list.

hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the answer. I am not sure how much memory itertools will take when the lists will get bigger. So I am taking as answer the one provided by @YS-L. – muammar Apr 23 '14 at 21:33

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