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I'm new to Oracle SQL and I am having a hard time adding a constraint. I am trying to add constraints on my table to enforce specific business rules that only allows students only to take 4 courses and a max of 25 students per class.

Please let me know what additional information you need from me to help answer this question. I am at a loss...

CREATE TABLE GRADES
(STU_ID       int NOT NULL ENABLE,
 CRSE_ID        CHAR(9) NOT NULL ENABLE,
 STU_CRSE_GRADE VARCHAR2(20) 
 check(STU_CRSE_GRADE='A' or 
       STU_CRSE_GRADE='B' or 
       STU_CRSE_GRADE='C' or 
       STU_CRSE_GRADE ='D' or 
       STU_CRSE_GRADE= 'F'),
 CONSTRAINT GRADES_PK PRIMARY KEY (STU_ID, CRSE_ID),
 constraint fk_Grades Foreign key(Stu_ID)
   REFERENCES Students,
 constraint fk_Grades_Crse_ID foreign key(Crse_ID)
   REFERENCES Courses
);

No problem! See tables below:

CREATE TABLE Students
(Stu_ID int Constraint pk_Stu_ID Primary Key,
Stu_name VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL, Stu_Add varchar(255),
Stu_Maj CHAR(6)
);

CREATE TABLE Instructors
(Instr_ID char(3) Constraint pk_Instr_ID Primary Key,
Instr_Name VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL, Instr_Office varchar(8)
);

CREATE TABLE Courses
(Crse_ID char(9) Constraint pk_Crse_ID Primary Key,
Crse_Title VARCHAR(255) NOT NULL,
Student’s name: Lai Xia
Instr_ID CHAR(3) not null,
constraint fk_Courses_Instr_ID Foreign key(Instr_ID) REFERENCES Instructors
);
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3  
Presumably, you have some tables not listed here that show what classes a student is taking and what students are in a class. The grades table doesn't appear to be relevant to your question-- you'd need to post the tables that are. The rules you listed here do not appear to be the sort of thing that you can enforce with constraints, they are probably the sort of thing that you'd enforce with triggers if this is a homework assignment. Triggers would create other issues in the real world. –  Justin Cave Apr 21 '14 at 17:20
    
It sounds like you need an insert trigger –  dev_feed Apr 21 '14 at 17:21
    
As @JustinCave said, it would be hard to help without seeing the Students and Courses tables. –  dev_feed Apr 21 '14 at 17:23

2 Answers 2

The foreign key alone can only represents a one-to-many relationship. If you want to limit the "many" portion to a specific number, you'll need to either:

  1. Do it in the application code or triggers.
  2. Or redesign the rest of the database to "help" the FK in achieving that goal.

The (1) is easy to implement but easy to get wrong: you'll have to carefully employ locking to avoid race conditions in the concurrent environment:

  • Let's say two concurrent transactions are attempting to connect the same student to a different course.
  • The first transaction counts the courses currently connected to the student and finds that there are 3 of them. All good and well.
  • The second transaction does the same and also sees only 3 courses (because the first transaction hasn't committed yet).
  • So both transactions think they won't exceed the allowed number and both happily proceed with inserting their student-course connection.
  • End result: the student is connected to 5 courses, violating the rule that it can be connected to only 4.

To avoid that, you'll need to serialize these operations, probably by locking the student through SELECT ... FOR UPDATE.


The (2) could be implemented by changing the key design, and then limiting the values a key can have. For example, enforcing that a student can take at most 4 courses can be done like this:

CREATE TABLE STUDENT (
    STUDENT_ID INT PRIMARY KEY
);

CREATE TABLE COURSE (
    COURSE_ID INT PRIMARY KEY
);

CREATE TABLE STUDENT_COURSE (
    STUDENT_ID INT REFERENCES STUDENT,
    COURSE_ID INT REFERENCES COURSE,
    COURSE_NO INT NOT NULL CHECK (COURSE_NO IN (1, 2, 3, 4)),
    PRIMARY KEY (STUDENT_ID, COURSE_ID),
    UNIQUE (STUDENT_ID, COURSE_NO)
);

The combination of CHECK and UNIQUE constraints means the DBMS itself will refuse to connect the same student to more than 4 courses.

Doing this will succeed:

INSERT INTO STUDENT_COURSE VALUES (11, 111, 1);
INSERT INTO STUDENT_COURSE VALUES (11, 222, 2);
INSERT INTO STUDENT_COURSE VALUES (11, 333, 3);
INSERT INTO STUDENT_COURSE VALUES (11, 444, 4);

But doing this obviously won't (CHECK constraint violation):

INSERT INTO STUDENT_COURSE VALUES (11, 555, 5);

BTW, when student is already connected to some courses and you want to find the remaining free "slots", you can do it like this:

SELECT NEW_NO
FROM (
    SELECT
        COURSE_NO + 1 NEW_NO,
        LEAD (COURSE_NO) OVER (ORDER BY COURSE_NO) NEXT_NO
    FROM STUDENT_COURSE
    WHERE STUDENT_ID = 11
)
WHERE NEW_NO <> NEXT_NO OR NEXT_NO IS NULL;

[SQL Fiddle]

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Looks like you already learned about basic constraints in oracle (like check and foreign key). For the more complicated scenarious you may use triggers. Triggers are executed on set of events (when you try to insert, update or delete a record into table).

I assume that student takes only 4 courses mean that every student could have only 4 records in grades table. In trigger you can do exactly that. So you create a trigger before (there is also after ) insert or update, inside a trigger you check how many records student from inserting line already have and accept or decline particular insert/update operation.

Than you can write similar trigger for 25 students in a course. It will be another trigger on the same insert/update into grates table.

For exact syntax try documnentation first, triggers are fun :)

Also, later you may consider writing stored procedures as a more advanced way of implementing business logic in database. good luck!

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