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I have a scenario in which i am thinking if i can apply any design pattern. The scenario is like this: a base class has 2 derived classes and in the main function we need to do the same operations on both the derived classes. I need this in c++.

For example:

Class Base
{
    virtual bool DoWeHaveToPerformOperation()=0;
    virtual void PerformOperation()=0;
};

Class Derived1:public Base
{
    bool DoWeHaveToPerformOperation();
    void PerformOperation();
};

Class Derived2:public Base
{
    bool DoWeHaveToPerformOperation();
    void PerformOperation();
};

int main()
{
    Derived1 d1;
    if(d1.DoWeHaveToPerformOperation())
    {
        d1.PerformOperation();
    }

    Derived2 d2;
    if(d2.DoWeHaveToPerformOperation())
    {
        d2.PerformOperation();
    }
}

Instead of writing like above in the main, I am wondering if there is some how i can optimize the code (or if there is a pattern that could be used).. I am thinking of at least moving the common code to a seperate function and call it for both the objects like

CheckAndOperate(Base* b)
{
    if(b->DoWeHaveToPerformOperation())
    {
        b->PerformOperation();
    }
}

and call it for both the derived objects .. But i feel it could still be optimized..

int main()
{
    base* b1=new derived1();
    CheckAndOperate(b1);
    base* b2=new derived2();
    CheckAndOperate(b2);
    delete b1;
    delete b2;
}

Any suggestions please?.

share|improve this question
    
Optimized how? What aspect are you actually trying to improve? The code can certainly be improved, but that's really question for the code review site unless you have a specific problem. –  Useless Apr 21 at 18:27
    
There isn't enough information in my opinion. Do you need to implement somekind of chaining where you make the call once and then the behavior is automatically executed on a chain of things? Without knowing what specifically this operation is, one could suggest any number of design patterns to look at. Alternatively, perhaps each object is an observer waiting for an event? –  shawn1874 Apr 21 at 20:16

2 Answers 2

The Template Method pattern typically deals with this type of thing.

Class Base
{
public:
    void PerformOperation()
    {
        if(DoWeHaveToPerformOperation())
        {
            DoPerformOperation();
        }
    }

protected:
    virtual bool DoWeHaveToPerformOperation()=0;
    virtual void DoPerformOperation() = 0;
};

Class Derived1:public Base
{
    bool DoWeHaveToPerformOperation();
    void DoPerformOperation();
};

Class Derived2:public Base
{
    bool DoWeHaveToPerformOperation();
    void DoPerformOperation();
};

int main()
{
    Derived1 d1;
    d1.PerformOperation();

    Derived2 d2;
    d2.PerformOperation();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer

Yes, putting the common code into a function is the right thing to do.

void CheckAndOperate(Base &b) {
  if(b.DoWeHaveToPerformOperation()) {
    b.PerformOperation();
  }
}

Also your example doesn't really require dynamic allocation:

int main() {
  Derived1 d1;
  CheckAndOperate(d1);
  Derived2 d2;
  CheckAndOperate(d2);
}

Compilers may be able to perform inlining and devirtualization, but if you want to encourage it you can implement the shared code in a template:

template<typename CheckableAndOperatable>
void CheckAndOperate(CheckableAndOperatable &x) {
  if(x.DoWeHaveToPerformOperation()) {
    x.PerformOperation();
  }
}

and in C++11 you can go further by making the derived implementation methods final; the compiler knows that if it has a derived type then it can always devirtualized calls to final methods:

class Derived1 : public Base {
public:
    bool DoWeHaveToPerformOperation() final;
    void PerformOperation() final;
};
share|improve this answer

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