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I've got a makefile (developed for gmake on Linux) that I'm attempting to port to OSX, but it seems like sed doesn't want to cooperate. What I do is use GCC to autogenerate dependency files, and then tweak them a bit using sed. The relevant portion of the makefile:

$(OBJ_DIR)/%.d: $(SRC_DIR)/%.cpp
  $(CPPC) -MM -MD $< -o $@
  sed -i 's|\(.*\)\.o:|$(OBJ_DIR)/\1.o $(OBJ_DIR)/\1.d $(TEST_OBJ_DIR)/\1_utest.o:|' $@

While this runs with no trouble under GNU/Linux, I get errors like the following when attempting to build on OSX:

sed: 1: "test/obj/equipmentConta ...": undefined label 'est/obj/equipmentContainer_utest.d'
sed: 1: "test/obj/dice_utest.d": undefined label 'est/obj/dice_utest.d'
sed: 1: "test/obj/color-string_u ...": undefined label 'est/obj/color-string_utest.d'

It would seem like sed is chopping off a character, but I can't see the solution.

Thanks in advance,
Cheers!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 42 down vote accepted

OS X sed handles the -i argument differently to the Linux version.

You can probably generate a command that will work for both by adding -e:

#      vv
sed -i -e 's|\(.*\)\.o:|$(OBJ_DIR)/\1.o $(OBJ_DIR)/\1.d $(TEST_OBJ_DIR)/\1_utest.o:|' $@

It's because OS X sed -i interprets the next thing after the -i as a file extension for a backup copy of the in-place edit. (Probably the Linux version only does this if there is no space between the -i and the extension.)

The upshot of this is that sed consumes the s||| as the extension (!) then interprets the next argument as a command - in this case it begins with t, which sed recognises as a branch-to-label command expecting the target label as an argument - hence the error you see.

If you create a file testyou can reproduce the error on OS X:

$ sed -i 's|x|y|' test
sed: 1: "test": undefined label 'est'
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Brilliant - thanks so much! –  Chris Feb 23 '10 at 22:17
1  
I think if POSIXLY_CORRECT or (older) POSIX_ME_HARDER is defined in the environment, the same behavior can be expected. –  Tim Post Feb 24 '10 at 12:39
6  
OS X 10.6.7 creates backup files named test-e (following the above example) if the flags -i -e ... are used. –  Adam Lindberg Jun 28 '11 at 9:16
    
The proper fix for OSX is to have an empty argument to -i but then again this is not compatible with Linux sed. )-: Maybe use Perl instead? perl -pi -e 's|x|y|g' file –  tripleee Jan 18 at 17:29

Actally.. doing

sed -i -e "s/blah/blah/" files

doesn't do what you expect in OS X either.. instead it creates backup files with "-e" extension.

The proper for OS is

sed -i "" -e "s/blah/blah/" files
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Right but your answer doesn't work for Linux which is the main issue: needs to work for both. Using -i -e it's still possible to delete -e extension files. –  Murphy Feb 28 '12 at 21:14
2  
I suppose for generous definitions of 'working' that is the case. It's a clever hack, but it produces extra files. Urkle's answer is what I was looking for. –  brandon Aug 18 '12 at 23:38
    
WARNING if you try to find all files with the -e file extension and delete them with something like find . -type f | grep "-e$" | xargs rm you will delete all your files. Need to use "\-e" and even then run it without the pipe to xargs rm first. –  James Robinson Aug 18 '13 at 10:48
1  
@JamesRobinson, just use find . -name "*-e" -delete. Always run without the -delete flag first though just to confirm what you're about to delete. –  Martin Konecny Sep 17 '13 at 14:09
1  
It appears that the space in -i "" needs to be removed to make it work also on Linux: see stackoverflow.com/a/14813278/15690 –  blueyed Sep 26 '13 at 10:20

I came across this issue as well and thought of the following solution:

darwin=false;
case "`uname`" in
  Darwin*) darwin=true ;;
esac

if $darwin; then
  sedi="/usr/bin/sed -i ''"
else
  sedi="sed -i"
fi

$sedi 's/foo/bar/' /home/foobar/bar

works for me ;-), YMMV

I work in a multi-OS team where ppl build on Windows, Linux and OS X. Some OS X users complained because they got another error - they had the GNU port of sed installed so I had to specify the full path.

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1  
Your solution is truly cross platform. Thank you. –  Jason D Apr 28 at 21:33
    
That creates a bar'' backup file for me. But not when writing out the command directly in terminal. Can't really figure out why. –  Arlukin Dec 3 at 23:27
    
I had to use eval. eval "$sedi 's/foo/bar/' /home/foobar/bar". This was only tested on os x. –  Arlukin Dec 4 at 7:12

This isn't quite an answer to the question, but one can get linux-equivalent behavior through brew install gnu-sed --default-names

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This is definitely the quickest solution for me. –  archie hicox 21 hours ago

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