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As many would say, the singleton is bad, it is an "anti-pattern". Fortunately or not I work with some code which DOES have it and it would not go away in near future. So my problem is as follows.

A singleton having a state:

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public enum Singleton {
    INSTANCE;

    private final Map<String, String> _mapper = new HashMap<String, String>();

    public String getValue(String key) {
        return _mapper.get(key);
    }

    public void addEntry(String key, String val) {
        _mapper.put(key, val);
    }

    public String removeKey(String key) {
        return _mapper.remove(key);
    }
}

Very dumb test which does not take into account that singleton INSTANCE state is preserved over test runs:

import org.junit.Assert;
import org.junit.Test;

public class SingletonTest {

    public static final String KEY_1 = "key_1";

    @Test public void testOne() {
        Singleton.INSTANCE.addEntry(KEY_1, "val_1");
        Singleton.INSTANCE.addEntry("key_2", "val_2");
    }

    @Test public void testTwo() {
        Assert.assertNull(Singleton.INSTANCE.getValue(KEY_1));
    }
}

How the state could be cleaned in-between of test runs ? Could it be done with JUnit Runners ?

Actual state of object is more complicated and initialised via a constructor. I was looking for something like : http://powermock.googlecode.com/svn/docs/powermock-1.3.5/apidocs/org/powermock/core/classloader/annotations/PrepareForTest.html

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If the member functions of Singleton that are context sensitive are few, you can try to use a ThreadLocal variable. If the variable is set, use the ThreadLocal context otherwise use the global context –  agbinfo Apr 21 '14 at 21:29
    
I think you need to edit the question to be more precise about what kinds of solutions are and aren't acceptable, and why they're not. It's hard to guess around the constraints you don't seem to be telling us. –  yshavit Apr 21 '14 at 22:00

3 Answers 3

You can use a method decorated with @After that will be executed after each test is executed. In this method, you can clear the state of the map in your enum:

@After
public void clear() {
    Singleton.INSTANCE.removeKey(KEY_1);
    Singleton.INSTANCE.removeKey("key_2");
    //and on and on...
}

Of course, a better approach would be having a clear method in your enum that will clear the values of the map, so the body of your @After method would become shorter:

@After
public void clear() {
    //assuming you can create such method
    Singleton.INSTANCE.clearEntries();
}
share|improve this answer
    
clear() would be one part of the story, because actual state is more complicated, what is there is only a snippet simple enough to reproduce my problem. –  Artem Oboturov Apr 21 '14 at 21:21
    
@ArtemOboturov post the real code to get a more accurate answer instead. –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 21 '14 at 21:22
    
I edited the question –  Artem Oboturov Apr 21 '14 at 21:25
1  
@ArtemOboturov you first ask how to clear the state between test runs, now you ask why should? Seriously, I still don't get your real exact problem. Also, if you start a parallel runner without using my approach, the tests should fail as well. –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 21 '14 at 21:34
1  
@ArtemOboturov why do you not consider it as a solution? What's the exact problem with this approach you don't find it good? –  Luiggi Mendoza Apr 21 '14 at 21:44

One option is to include a package-private clear method on the enum. That's not totally fool-proof, but that method would hopefully be simple enough that it'll be pretty bug-free. In your example, it'd just call _mapper.clear().

Another option is to create a class Delegate with all the same methods as Singleton, and have Singleton just delegate to an instance of that class. Then, you test Delegate (not Singleton), instantiating a new one each time.

public enum Singleton {
    final Delegate delegate = new Delegate();

    public String getValue(String key) {
        return delegate.getValue(key);
    }

    // etc
}

class Delegate { // probably best as package-private
    private final Map<String, String> _mapper = new HashMap<String, String>();

    public String getValue(String key) {
        return _mapper.get(key);
    }

    // etc
}

This gives you a Delegate class with non-global state, which is easier to test. The global state in the Singleton class is the global Delegate instance it creates at the enum's classload time.

Of course, testing any class that uses Singleton is going to be trickier, but that doesn't seem to be your question.

share|improve this answer
    
clear() would be one part of the story, because actual state is more complicated, what is there is only a snippet simple enough to reproduce my problem. –  Artem Oboturov Apr 21 '14 at 21:19
    
I expanded on the second part of my answer, which sounds like it's probably the better option for you. –  yshavit Apr 21 '14 at 21:21
    
We are getting to Singleton instance holder pattern. And I know a workaround to clean state in that case. –  Artem Oboturov Apr 21 '14 at 21:23
    
So... does that not work for you? And if not, why? –  yshavit Apr 21 '14 at 21:33
    
Because there would be no use to have enum in the first place. I can just pick up the holder solution and use reflection to clean it all up. Or just to use a holder instance created per test case. –  Artem Oboturov Apr 21 '14 at 21:37

Here's something you may want to consider.

  enum Singleton {
    INSTANCE;

    ThreadLocal<Map<String, String>> context = new ThreadLocal<Map<String, String>>();
    private final Map<String, String> _mapper = new HashMap<String, String>();

    void createContext() {
      context.set(new HashMap<String, String>());
    }

    Map<String, String> getMapper() {
      Map<String, String> mapper;
      mapper = context.get();
      if (mapper==null) {
        mapper = _mapper;
      }
      return mapper;
    }

    public String getValue(String key) {
      return getMapper().get(key);
    }
    // ...
  }

In your test, you would call INSTANCE.createContext() during the setup.

If createContext is never called then the thread local variable is not created so the normal _mapper is used. Otherwise, the thread local variable will be retrieved and used instead.

share|improve this answer
    
So what do the test will test ? Two different implementation I suppose. –  Artem Oboturov Apr 21 '14 at 22:14
    
The implementation is the same except for the map. The implementation is exactly the same except for the how you retrieve the mapper. If you set a context, then INSTANCE will use that context but otherwise there are no changes. –  agbinfo Apr 21 '14 at 22:22
    
You would be using a different map if you cleared it between tests anyways. –  agbinfo Apr 21 '14 at 22:23
    
@ArtemOboturov In theory you could call INSTANCE.createContext() in your application's main thread and test exactly the same implementation but you would lose the lazy initialization property of the singleton. –  agbinfo Apr 21 '14 at 22:38

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