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Besides translating Relational data to Object model, The ORM has other roles, as:

  1. Lazy Loading
  2. Automatic change detection
  3. Transactions

However, with Repository pattern translating ORM's DTOs to Domain Models, that happens:

  1. Can't use the benefits of Lazy Load, since I need to fill my entire Domain Model and Repository doesn't know what data Domain needs.
  2. ORM can't detect changes, since Domain Model isn't from ORM world.
  3. Can't do many transactions at once, again, due the lack of Domain knowledge about ORM

Question 1: Am I missing some gap where I can have the full benefits of Lazy Loading, Transactions and Automatic change detection in a DDD scenario? Or these benefits are more for another approach (such as Active Record) than DDD?

Question 2: Why ORM is so mentioned in DDD books? Just for the relational to domain model and Lazy Loading, Transactions and Change Detection is fully discarted

Some platforms has code-first approach, which is a way to improve these problems, however this feature is not always present in many environments or simply is not able to use (in a legacy database for eg.), so it's not a solution.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

I have been thinking for some time that if one were to remove the change-tracking from an ORM then developers would see far less value in them.

Lazy-loading should never happen. An aggregate is always loaded in its entirety. If you find yourself requiring lazy-loading chances are that you are querying your domain model. This is something you should not do. Use a simple query layer / read model for that.

Transactions really are a DB concern and would not impact DDD directly. Aggregates do represent a consistency boundary so a database transaction is a natural fit but that is where it ends.

You could still use an ORM tool with DDD but you probably will get less mileage. I do not like ORMs at all and if I have any choice in the matter I simply do not use them. The mapping is really not all that much work and if done in a custom mapper class runs at language speeds as opposed to some proxy mechanism.

There are instances that I have seen where domain objects are, for instance, persisted directly using an ORM. However, if I have to mark anything using, say, an attribute or even change my design where I have to implement certain methods as virtual or even structure certain classes in a specific way I no longer regard my domain as persistent ignorant, and that is something I really want (PI).

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Thanks Eben! Now I have another question so, why ORM is so mentioned in DDD books? Just for the relational to domain model? and Lazy Loading, Transactions and Change Detection is just leftover? –  Wagner Leonardi Apr 22 '14 at 13:45
1  
There is object/relational mapping (O/RM) that we will always do when using a RDBMS (martinfowler.com/eaaCatalog/dataMapper.html) and then there are O/R Mapping tools/frameworks like NHibernate and Entity Framework. Maybe some folks find an ORM tool useful but I find that it may muddy the water slightly so I just do the mapping myself. When going for something like event sourcing it moves even further away from an ORM. Just my opinion though :) –  Eben Roux Apr 22 '14 at 15:45
2  
ORM tries to pretend you're using only objects forgetting about tables and sql. While a good idea, it doesn't really work in practice, albeit it's still useful. ORMs were and still are very used in enterprise software (where DDD originated). However, today we have NoSQl and document databases, Event Sourcing and CQRS. 10 years ago there was just RDBMS everywhere especially enterprise. So you can say it's some kind of a legacy, although they are still a valid choice, but IMO not for persisting domain. Experience has shown that using an ORM tool is more complicated than using CQRS or a doc db. –  MikeSW Apr 22 '14 at 15:46

However, with Repository pattern translating ORM's DTOs to Domain Models, that happens:

  1. Can't use the benefits of Lazy Load, since I need to fill my entire Domain Model and Repository doesn't know what data Domain needs.
  2. ORM can't detect changes, since Domain Model isn't from ORM world.
  3. Can't do many transactions at once, again, due the lack of Domain knowledge about ORM

There is no need to implement another layer for mapping ORM's entities into Domain Entities when modern ORMs are used. In the .NET world either Entity Framework or NHiberate are able to map your Rich Domain Model into Relational Data Base.

Code-First approach can be used with both of them.

First Domain Model is designed, then Data Base is generated using mappings (Entity Framework Fluent Api / Fluent NHibernate Mappings) or conventions (EF Custom Code First Conventions / Fluent NHibernate Auto Mapping)

There are some related SO questions:

  1. Advice on mapping of entities to domain objects
  2. Repository pattern and mapping between domain models and Entity Framework
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Code first approach is too specif as most ORM works with Database-First (My question isn't .NET attached). Thinking only about Database approach, the ORM's models can't be used as my Domain models, because I would expose my data layer to my entire application, do you agree? And if I translate the ORM's models to Domain ones, it falls in my question! –  Wagner Leonardi Apr 24 '14 at 17:47
    
Repository pattern doesn't kill ORM. Mapping from ORM entities into Domain Entities Kills ORM features. Custom mappings and data base refactoring can help you. There are several php ORMs (db.php, propel that support code first approach also. –  Ilya Palkin Apr 24 '14 at 19:38
    
@ilya-pakin I've completely understood you, however my question is about Database-First approach, I updated the question, please read it. How do I use database-first approach without killing ORM? Would you still recommends using ORM's Model as actual Domain model? Because besides whole application having direct access to a database member, the database would control my domain! That's insane :) , so you might have a best solution for this scenario! –  Wagner Leonardi Apr 24 '14 at 20:15
1  
It depends on an implementation. There is a pattern Unit of Work that handles business transactions (Application creates a unit of work, within the unit of work 5 Clients are changed (unit of work tracks changed domain entities), application commits the unit of work, DB transaction is created, 5 requests are sent to the DB, DB transaction is commented). So there is 5 inserts within 1 transaction. –  Ilya Palkin Apr 24 '14 at 21:00
1  
Lazy Load should be implemented also. There is a good article that helped me implement Lazy Load several years ago Four Ways to Implement Lazy Loading in C#. I've found the similar example for PHP - Practical PHP Patterns: Lazy Loading –  Ilya Palkin Apr 25 '14 at 9:48

Why ORM is so mentioned in DDD books? Just for the relational to domain model and Lazy Loading, Transactions and Change Detection is fully discarted

You can find DDD implementation for the Cargo system described in the blue book in http://dddsample.sourceforge.net/. It uses Hibernate as the ORM.

There are database transactions in application services, for example see se.citerus.dddsample.application.impl.BookingServiceImpl. @Transactional is annotation from Spring that causes method to be wrapped in a database transaction.

Change detection is not discarded. Repository in the original DDD pattern doesn't have update method, so change detection (ORM) is used to update domain objects. For example:

@Override
@Transactional
public void assignCargoToRoute(final Itinerary itinerary, final TrackingId trackingId) {
   final Cargo cargo = cargoRepository.find(trackingId);
   if (cargo == null) {
      throw new IllegalArgumentException("Can't assign itinerary to non-existing cargo " + trackingId);
   }

   cargo.assignToRoute(itinerary);
   cargoRepository.store(cargo);

   logger.info("Assigned cargo " + trackingId + " to new route");
}

Actually in the sample, repository has update method, because cargoRepository.store() is the update method:

public void store(Cargo cargo) {
   getSession().saveOrUpdate(cargo);
   // Delete-orphan does not seem to work correctly when the parent is a component
   getSession().createSQLQuery("delete from Leg where cargo_id = null").executeUpdate();
}

Surprisingly, you can find the usage of lazy collection in the official sample, for example in src/main/resources/se/citerus/dddsample/infrastructure/persistence/hibernate/Cargo.hbm.xml:

<hibernate-mapping default-access="field">
   <class name="se.citerus.dddsample.domain.model.cargo.Cargo" table="Cargo">

   ...

   <component name="itinerary">
       <list name="legs" lazy="true" cascade="all">
           <key column="cargo_id" foreign-key="itinerary_fk"/>
           <index column="leg_index"/>
           <one-to-many class="se.citerus.dddsample.domain.model.cargo.Leg"/>
       </list>
   </component>
   </class>
</hibernate-mapping>

So, the answer is you can still have all the benefit of your ORM.

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