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I am getting an error while assigning a value.

My code is:

    protected bool ValidateProfile()
    {
       bool blnFirstName = false;
       bool blnLastName = false;
       bool blnEMail = false;

      //(error on line below: "The left-hand side of an assignment must be a variable, property or indexer")
       ValidateProfile() = false;


   if txtFName != ""
      blnFName = true;

   if txtLName != ""
      blnLName = true;

   if txtEMail != ""
      blnEMail = true;

   if (blnFName) && (blnLName) && (blnEMail))
     ValidateProfile = true;

    }

How do I assign a boolean value to ValidateProfile ?

Thanks

share|improve this question
    
VB or FORTRAN programmer. –  John Saunders Feb 23 '10 at 19:51
2  
@Nick: I don't think John was dissing him...just remarking on the programming world the person came from. You'll note that John actually gave a highly voted correct answer to the question. –  Beska Feb 23 '10 at 20:00
1  
@Nick, John was actually responding to my comment..which I had removed.. my comment was "whaaaat??" as for a moment I forgot that languages other than C# exist in this world :P –  Stan R. Feb 23 '10 at 20:03
1  
I'm wondering why the downvote? This seems like an honest question from a person new to the language. –  Jeremy S Feb 23 '10 at 20:03
1  
Microsoft officially distanced itself from Hungarian notation around the time of the 2005 PDC conference (if memory serves). With modern IDE's and type safe languages, the benefits of Hungarian notation are more limited and it tends to make code a bit harder to read. –  Eric J. Feb 23 '10 at 20:12

7 Answers 7

up vote 2 down vote accepted

As others have pointed out, in C# you use return instead of MyFunction = x. In this scenario, you can assign the result of your final check to a boolean and return it:

bool retVal =  (blnFName) && (blnLName) && (blnEMail);
return retVal;

Alternatively, you could just skip the assignment altogether:

return (blnFName) && (blnLName) && (blnEMail);

EDIT: I noticed you are using hungarian notation, which implies that txtFName is a TextBox. Keep in mind that C# doesn't have default properties like VB. If it is a TextBox, it will never equal "", because it's not of type System.String. I'm guessing you actually wanting to evaluate txtFName.Text

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the info, Jeremy. That would make the code easy. –  user279521 Feb 23 '10 at 20:13
    
Using a separate bool for each field and &&ing them is not good practice. –  Nate Feb 23 '10 at 20:20
    
@Jeremy: yes, I am evaluating txtFName.Text –  user279521 Feb 23 '10 at 20:38
    
Be sure to set up your project with Option Strict On to catch many common issues. –  Chris Dunaway Feb 23 '10 at 22:30
    
@Nate: which part? the separate bool fields or &&ing multiple bool values? granted you could return false evaluating each boolean individually, but it ends up being the same operation. –  Jeremy S Feb 24 '10 at 17:53

You want

return false;

In C#, we don't assign values to the function name in order to return a value.


If you want to set the return value at a different point in time from when you return from the method, then you should do something like this:

bool retVal; // Defaults to false

if (condition)
    retVal = true;

if (otherCondition)
    retVal = false;

if (thirdCondition)
    retVal = true;

return retVal;
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 i forgot this is an old VB thing... –  Stan R. Feb 23 '10 at 19:52
    
John, I need to use the expression (if ValidateProfile then do this) in other places in the app. How can I do that using a retVal ? –  user279521 Feb 23 '10 at 20:05
    
if(ValidateProfile()) { /*then*/ } –  Dykam Feb 23 '10 at 20:13
    
You would write if (ValidateProfile()) { /* Do Stuff */ } –  Eric J. Feb 23 '10 at 20:13
    
@user, thats what you do if(ValidateProfile()) { //do this}, remember for comparison you need to use "==" like so if(ValidateProfile()==false) { // do something } –  Stan R. Feb 23 '10 at 20:14

You can't assign a value to a function. You need return false;

share|improve this answer

Change that last line to:

return false;

Although it seems you're always returning false here. Is there an option to return true?

share|improve this answer
    
yes, I modified my code block up above; the code block checks to see if user has entered values, then set ValidateProfile = true. –  user279521 Feb 23 '10 at 19:56
    
Great. You need to use "return" plus a value of the type of the method's return value type when returning a value from a method in C#. –  David Morton Feb 23 '10 at 19:57
    
Can you post an exmaple, plz? –  user279521 Feb 23 '10 at 19:57
    
wont the processor jump out of the code block after "return = false;" ? –  user279521 Feb 23 '10 at 19:59
    
Yes it will jump out of the block, but what it's really doing is "returning a value to caller". When you just use return;, it basically translates to return void;. –  Jeremy S Feb 23 '10 at 20:11

Just a side note besides all the returns...

You may want to change this:

if txtFName != ""

To check if the String.IsEmptyOrNull(txtFName.Text)

Or at least initialize your variables to either null or String.Empty.

Just an FYI though.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks JonH. Didn't realize that. –  user279521 Feb 23 '10 at 20:08

You want to return false


Alright, taking the code you posted:

protected bool ValidateProfile()
{
      return !String.IsNullOrEmpty(txtFName) && !String.IsNullOrEmpty(txtLName) && !String.IsNullOrEmpty(txtEMail);
}

Or

protected bool ValidateProfile()
{
    bool returnValue = true;

    if(String.IsNullOrEmpty(txtFName))
    {
         returnValue=false;
    } 
    else if(String.IsNullOrEmpty(txtLName))
    {
         returnValue = false;
    } 
    else if(String.IsNullOrEmpty(txtEMail))
    {
         returnValue = false;
    }

    return returnValue;

}

Though you could just return false as soon as you find an invalid field.

share|improve this answer

Not a C# programmer, but can't you just write:

return (txtFName != "") && (txtLName != "") && (txtEMail != "");

for the body of the function?

share|improve this answer
2  
In c# you should use String.IsNullOrEmpty(variable) –  Nate Feb 23 '10 at 20:05
    
Thanks Nate. Does C# evaluate a NULL string to false? How about an empty string? –  Larry Lustig Feb 23 '10 at 20:29
    
In C# a string does not have any implicit conversion to boolean. If you try it, you'll get an error. You have to use some kind of function on the string that will return a boolean, such as in your answer, or @Nate's response. –  Beska Feb 24 '10 at 14:24

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