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I create a clone of the echo command and that's more complicated than I was thinking. Here my problem : How works a char *argv[]? I know how works char myString[], but no that weird way to create strings :

  • It's a pointer on an array of chars, or an array of pointers on chars?
  • Why when I *argv[n], it shows me the n argument, not the n char... Chars can ve
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cout << argv[n] -> it should print nth argument –  Prabhu Apr 22 '14 at 8:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

char* argv[] behaves just like char** argv would behave. You could also use an char argv[][] the same way.

So basically, when you call *argv, you get argv[0] and *argv[n] gives you argv[0][n]

edit: to convert argv[x] into a std::string:

std::string s(argv[x]);

from that point on s is a standard string. But keep in mind that you must have zero terminated strings, this will not work for random binary data in a char**!

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So, how have the size of a specific argument? –  sosolal Apr 22 '14 at 9:00
    
@sosolal you want to get the size of a specific string in the argv[]? you could iterate over argv[x] until argv[x][i] == '\0', then the string is over. –  Theolodis Apr 22 '14 at 9:09
    
How complicate stuff for nothing... I will try that. –  sosolal Apr 22 '14 at 9:16
    
@sosolal if you want it faster, safer etc I'd recommend you to use the std::string in c++. It has a method length() that returns exactly the length of the string. –  Theolodis Apr 22 '14 at 9:26
    
How convert char*[] in strings? –  sosolal Apr 22 '14 at 9:31

It's a pointer on an array of chars, or an array of pointers on chars?

In C, arrays are always passed as pointer to the first element. So, effectively you can treat it as char**, which is a pointer to pointer of char.

Why when I *argv[n], it shows me the n argument, not the n char... Chars can ve

You can split that expression according to the operator precedence:

char* p = argv[n];
char  c = *p;
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