Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is meant by Resource Acquisition is Initialization (RAII)?

share|improve this question
6  
    
This is what drives it home for me. stroustrup.com/bs_faq2.html#finally –  Hal Canary May 21 '13 at 22:45

4 Answers 4

This is a programming idiom which briefly means that you

  • encapsulate a resource into a class (whose constructor usually - but not necessarily** - acquires the resource, and its destructor always releases it)
  • use the resource via a local instance of the class*
  • the resource is automatically freed when the object gets out of scope

This guarantees that whatever happens while the resource is in use, it will eventually get freed (whether due to normal return, destruction of the containing object, or an exception thrown).

It is a widely used good practice in C++, because apart from being a safe way to deal with resources, it also makes your code much cleaner as you don't need to mix error handling code with the main functionality.

* Update: "local" may mean a local variable, or a nonstatic member variable of a class. In the latter case the member variable is initialized and destroyed with its owner object.

** Update2: as @sbi pointed out, the resource - although often is allocated inside the constructor - may also be allocated outside and passed in as a parameter.

share|improve this answer
    
AFAIK, the acronym doesn't imply the object has to be on a local (stack) variable. It could be a member variable of another object, so when the 'holding' object is destroyed, the member object is destroyed too, and the resource is released. In fact, i think the acronym specifically means only that there's no open()/close() methods to initialize and release the resource, just the constructor and destructor, so the 'holding' of the resource is just the lifetime of the object, no matter if that lifetime is handled by the context (stack) or explicitly (dynamic alloc) –  Javier Feb 23 '10 at 20:51
    
Actually nothing says the resource must be acquired in the constructor. File streams, strings an other containers do that, but the resource might just as well be passed to the constructor, as is usually the case with smart pointers. Since yours is the most-upvoted answer, you might want to fix this. –  sbi Oct 8 '12 at 20:59
    
It is not an acronym, it is an abbreviation. IIRC most people pronounce it "ar ey ay ay" so it doesn't really qualify for an acronym like say DARPA, which is pronounced DARPA instead of spelled. Also, I'd say RAII is a paradigm rather than a mere idiom. –  ddriver Aug 5 '13 at 10:24

It's a really terrible name for an incredibly powerful concept, and perhaps one of the number 1 things that C++ developers miss when they switch to other languages. There has been a bit of a movement to try to rename this concept as Scope-Bound Resource Management, though it doesn't seem to have caught on just yet.

When we say 'Resource' we don't just mean memory - it could be file handles, network sockets, database handles, GDI objects... In short, things that we have a finite supply of and so we need to be able to control their usage. The 'Scope-bound' aspect means that the lifetime of the object is bound to the scope of a variable, so when the variable goes out of scope then the destructor will release the resource. A very useful property of this is that it makes for greater exception-safety. For instance, compare this:

RawResourceHandle* handle=createNewResource();
handle->performInvalidOperation();  // Oops, throws exception
...
deleteResource(handle); // oh dear, never gets called so the resource leaks

With the RAII one

class ManagedResourceHandle {
public:
   ManagedResourceHandle(RawResourceHandle* rawHandle_) : rawHandle(rawHandle_) {};
   ~ManagedResourceHandle() {delete rawHandle_; }
   ... // omitted operator*, etc
};

ManagedResourceHandle handle(createNewResource());
handle->performInvalidOperation();

In this latter case, when the exception is thrown and the stack is unwound, the local variables are destroyed which ensures that our resource is cleaned up and doesn't leak.

share|improve this answer
1  
This is a very good answer. –  khalafnt Dec 28 '13 at 12:07
    
Very clear and not just conceptual. Thank you. –  Ivan Z. Siu Mar 3 at 4:46
    
+1 for "it's a really terrible name" –  deinocheirus Apr 3 at 14:46

"RAII" stands for "Resource Acquisition is Initialization" and is actually quite a misnomer, since it isn't resource acquisition (and the initialization of an object) it is concerned with, but releasing the resource (by means of destruction of an object).
But RAII is the name we got and it sticks.

At its very heart, the idiom features encapsulating resources (chunks of memory, open files, unlocked mutexes, you-name-it) in local, automatic objects, and having the destructor of that object releasing the resource when the object is destroyed at the end of the scope it belongs to:

{
  raii obj(acquire_resource());
  // ...
} // obj's dtor will call release_resource()

Of course, objects aren't always local, automatic objects. They could be members of a class, too:

class something {
private:
  raii obj_;  // will live and die with instances of the class
  // ... 
};

If such objects manage memory, they are often called "smart pointers".

There are many variations of this. For example, in the first code snippets the question arises what would happen if someone wanted to copy obj. The easiest way out would be to simply disallow copying. std::unique_ptr<>, a smart pointer to be part of the standard library as featured by the next C++ standard, does this.
Another such smart pointer, std::shared_ptr features "shared ownership" of the resource (a dynamically allocated object) it holds. That is, it can freely be copied and all copies refer to the same object. The smart pointer keeps track of how many copies refer to the same object and will delete it when the last one is being destroyed.
A third variant is featured by std::auto_ptr which implements a kind of move-semantics: An object is owned by only one pointer, and attempting to copy an object will result (through syntax hackery) in transferring ownership of the object to the target of the copy operation.

share|improve this answer
1  
std::auto_ptr is obsolete version of std::unique_ptr. std::auto_ptr kind of simulated move semantics as much as it was possible in C++98, std::unique_ptr uses the new move semantics of C++11. New class was created because the move semantics of C++11 is more explicit (requires std::move except from temporary) while it was defaulted for any copy from non-const in std::auto_ptr. –  Jan Hudec Aug 5 '13 at 9:40

The book C++ Programming with Design Patterns Revealed describes RAII as (and I paraphrase*):

  1. Acquiring all resources
  2. Using resources
  3. Releasing resources

    • Resources are implemented as classes, and all pointers have class wrappers around them (making them smart pointers).

    • Resources are acquired by invoking their constructors and released implicitly (in reverse order of acquiring) by invoking their destructors.

* Because I haven't received written permission from the publisher to quote the book.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.