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This is a further discussion on this question:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2321270/why-is-it-still-possible-to-insert-a-foreign-key-that-doesnt-exist

This works:

CREATE TABLE products (
     id integer unsigned auto_increment primary key
) ENGINE=INNODB;

CREATE TABLE orders (
     id integer PRIMARY KEY auto_increment,
     product_id integer unsigned,
     quantity integer,
     INDEX product_id_idx (product_id),
     FOREIGN KEY (product_id) REFERENCES products (id)
) ENGINE=INNODB;

But these 2 not:

A

CREATE TABLE products (
     id integer unsigned auto_increment primary key
) ENGINE=INNODB;

CREATE TABLE orders (
    id integer PRIMARY KEY auto_increment,
    product_id integer unsigned REFERENCES products (id),
    quantity integer,
    INDEX product_id_idx (product_id)
);

B

CREATE TABLE products (
     id integer auto_increment primary key
) ENGINE=INNODB;

CREATE TABLE orders (
     id integer PRIMARY KEY auto_increment,
     product_id integer unsigned,
     quantity integer,
     INDEX product_id_idx (product_id),
     FOREIGN KEY (product_id) REFERENCES products (id)
) ENGINE=INNODB;

For B,it's because integer primary key is the same as integer unsigned primary key

Can you explain why A and B are not working?

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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

A does not work because InnoDB does not recognize or support the syntax for "Inline REFERENCES specifications." They are simply ignored.

B does not work because the referencing and referenced columns need to be of the exact same type. "The size and sign of integer types must be the same." MySQL's numeric data types are signed by default, so you would have to explicitly specify the unsigned attribute. You can test that INT AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY does not imply unsigned:

CREATE TABLE a (a INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY) ENGINE=INNODB;
INSERT INTO a VALUES(-5);
SELECT * FROM a;

Source and further reading:

share|improve this answer
    
But,as I said in my post,primary key implies unsigned,right? –  user198729 Feb 23 '10 at 21:19
    
@user198729: No that isn't implied. MySQL numeric data types are signed by default, so you would have to explicitly specify the unsigned attribute: dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/numeric-type-overview.html –  Daniel Vassallo Feb 23 '10 at 21:30
    
For A,if inline references aren't recognized by InnoDB,then what are they used for? –  user198729 Feb 23 '10 at 21:40
    
@user198729: Try this: CREATE TABLE a (a INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT PRIMARY KEY) ENGINE=INNODB;. Then insert a negative value: INSERT INTO a VALUES(-5);... AUTO_INCREMENT does not imply unsigned. –  Daniel Vassallo Feb 23 '10 at 21:40
    
@user198729: Inline references are defined in the SQL standard, but MySQL did not implement this. They cannot be used in MySQL at the moment. –  Daniel Vassallo Feb 23 '10 at 21:43

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