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I want to override toString() for my enum, Color. However, I can't figure out how to get the value of an instance of Color inside the Color enum. Is there a way to do this in Java?

Example:

public enum Color {
    RED,
    GREEN,
    BLUE,
    ...

    public String toString() {
        // return "R" for RED, "G", for GREEN, etc.
    }
}
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6 Answers

up vote 15 down vote accepted
public enum Color {
    RED("R"),
    GREEN("G"),
    BLUE("B");

    private final String str;
    private Color(String s){
        str = s;
    }
    public String toString() {
        return str;
    }
}

You can use constructors for Enums. I haven't tested the syntax, but this is the idea.

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1  
I'd suggest adding a final and a couple of privates. Oh, and a semicolon. –  Tom Hawtin - tackline Feb 23 '10 at 21:19
    
Thanks Tom, I've edited accordingly.. –  Erkan Haspulat Feb 23 '10 at 21:23
    
Forgive my question if it's a stupid one but shouldn't you use "@Override" before your toString method ? –  Andy M Feb 23 '10 at 21:27
1  
@Erkan: @Override is not used by javadoc, javadoc can figure that out a method is overriden, it is there for the compiler. –  vickirk Feb 23 '10 at 21:34
1  
Yeah, @Override is good for those cases where you accidentally spell the method name wrong, or more likely in some cases, get the argument types wrong and aren't really overriding what you think you are. The compiler will yell at you. –  PSpeed Feb 23 '10 at 22:44
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You can also switch on the type of this, for example:

public enum Foo { 
  A, B, C, D 
  ; 
  @Override 
  public String toString() { 
    switch (this) { 
      case A: return "AYE"; 
      case B: return "BEE"; 
      case C: return "SEE"; 
      case D: return "DEE"; 
      default: throw new IllegalStateException(); 
    } 
  } 
} 
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The downvotes make me think this probably isn't possible, but it would be ideal for what I want to do. –  Matthew Feb 23 '10 at 21:36
3  
No, you can do a switch on an enum, it was probably down voted because there are better ways, I would do something like Chinmay's solution. It's a shame it is possible to down vote without commenting. –  vickirk Feb 23 '10 at 21:42
    
It compiles and works fine, not sure why it was down voted. In fact, the question asks "how to get the value" of an enum instance, which this answer describes... –  maerics Feb 23 '10 at 21:42
    
This answer is much the same as @Andy M's answer but his uses the OO-fashionable polymorphic function and yours uses the much-hated switch statement. You have to be careful using switch on SO: it's a down-vote magnet. –  Adrian Pronk Feb 23 '10 at 21:53
    
I returned it to '0' with my own up-vote. It answers the exact question posed even if this isn't the best way to achieve the meta-goal. For some other problem that actually does maybe require grabbing the enum instance it is important to remember that it's just an object like anything else and 'this' works. –  PSpeed Feb 23 '10 at 22:42
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Enum.name() - who'd of thunk it?

However, in most cases it makes more sense to keep any extra information in an instance variable that is set int the constructor.

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Use super and String.substring():

public enum Color
{
    RED,
    GREEN,
    BLUE;

    public String toString()
    {
        return "The color is " + super.toString().substring(0, 1);
    }
}
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where super.toString() is really just calling the name() method that Michael Borgwardt mentioned in his answer. –  MatrixFrog Feb 23 '10 at 21:57
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Java does this for you by default, it returns the .name() in .toString(), you only need to override toString() if you want something DIFFERENT from the name. The interesting methods are .name() and .ordinal() and .valueOf().

To do what you want you would do

.toString(this.name().substring(1));

What you might want to do instead is add an attribute called abbreviation and add it to the constructor, add a getAbbreviation() and use that instead of .toString()

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Or better still, look up the string to display from a bundle for the cases where the first char of the enum name is not that for the locale teh app is running in. –  vickirk Feb 23 '10 at 21:38
    
that is a good idea to make the code locale aware and internationalizable –  Jarrod Roberson Feb 23 '10 at 23:05
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I've found something like this (not tested tho):

public enum Color {
RED{
public String toString() {
    return "this is red";
}
},
GREEN{
public String toString() {
    return "this is green";
}
},
...   

}

Hope it helps a bit !

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See Erkan H's answer for the right way to go about this sort of thing. –  Mike Daniels Feb 23 '10 at 21:19
    
Oh yeah, I've seen it after I wrote this one ;) Thanks for the comment ! –  Andy M Feb 23 '10 at 21:20
    
@Mike: Any particular reason this is a bad idea? It seems the closest to what I actually want to do--I don't want to need to use constructors in the code that uses this enum. –  Matthew Feb 23 '10 at 21:22
    
And with my solution, you don't have to use an intermediate var in the enum... Of course, it has the drawback of duplicating the code and make it bad to read... It's an interesting question ! –  Andy M Feb 23 '10 at 21:24
    
But if you had more than 3 elements in your enum, the code would become difficult to read I beleive. Method declaration of toString() gets rewritten so many times. It gets the job done, but I prefer my way.. –  Erkan Haspulat Feb 23 '10 at 21:27
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