Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

If i were to run this code:

def function(y):
    y.append('yes')
    return y

example = list()
function(example)
print(example)

Why would it return ['yes'] even though i am not directly changing the variable 'example', and how could I modify the code so that 'example' is not effected by the function?

share|improve this question
    
effbot.org/zone/default-values.htm describes a different but somewhat related issue. Reading that might help you understand what's going on. –  MatrixFrog Feb 23 '10 at 22:04

3 Answers 3

Everything is a reference in Python. If you wish to avoid that behavior you would have to create a new copy of the original with list(). If the list contains more references, you'd need to use deepcopy()

def modify(l):
 l.append('HI')
 return l

def preserve(l):
 t = list(l)
 t.append('HI')
 return t

example = list()
modify(example)
print(example)

example = list()
preserve(example)
print(example)

outputs

['HI']
[]
share|improve this answer
2  
You can also create a copy of any list with myList[:], but keep in mind this is a "shallow copy" meaning that the nth element of the new list refers to the same object as the nth element of the old one. –  MatrixFrog Feb 23 '10 at 22:03
    
Good point, MatrixFrog –  Vinko Vrsalovic Feb 23 '10 at 22:05

"Why would it return ['yes']"

Because you modified the list, example.

"even though i am not directly changing the variable 'example'."

But you are, you provided the object named by the variable example to the function. The function modified the object using the object's append method.

As discussed elsewhere on SO, append does not create anything new. It modifies an object in place.

See http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1682567/why-does-pythons-list-append-evaluate-to-false, http://stackoverflow.com/questions/2022031/python-append-vs-operator-on-lists-why-do-these-give-different-results, http://stackoverflow.com/questions/1918270/python-lists-append-return-value.

and how could I modify the code so that 'example' is not effected by the function?

What do you mean by that? If you don't want example to be updated by the function, don't pass it to the function.

If you want the function to create a new list, then write the function to create a new list.

share|improve this answer

The easiest way to modify the code will be add the [:] to the function call.

def function(y):
    y.append('yes')
    return y



example = list()
function(example[:])
print(example)
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.