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I'm trying to setup a table using tablesorter, where the initial sort is based on hidden input values. I've got that working, but I also want the columns to all be unsortable, especially the one with the hidden input, as it'd be strange to the user to have a column sort based on invisible values.

The obvious solution is to not have it be hidden, and that solves everything. But it's supposed to be a playlist that the user can reorder and then save, and to keep things looking minimal, I want to keep the value hidden. I've tried using onRenderHeader and headerTemaple to manually remove each class, attribute, and click binding, but that didn't work:

/*...rest of initialization and stuff up here*/
headerTemplate: '{content}',
onRenderHeader: function (index){
    $(this).addClass('sorter-false');
    $(this).addClass('tablesorter-headerUnSorted');
    $(this).css('pointer','default');   
    $(this).removeClass('tablesorter-headerDesc');
    $(this).removeClass('tablesorter-headerAsc');
    $(this).attr('aria-disabled','true');
    $(this).unbind('click');
},

Here's the jsfiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/bigheadedmammal/a7Ybw/6/

So question: is there a way to setup an initial sort on a column, but also set that columns' sort to false? Do I need to create a custom widget to have that functionality?


edit: Got it!

I needed to set a custom textExtraction method. First, create the variable:

var hiddenExtract = function(node, table, cellIndex){
    return $(node).find("input[name='edit_clip_rank']").val();
}

And then add the property, textExtraction, to the initialization:

textExtraction: hiddenExtract

jsfiddle also updated. Hope this helps people down the road. I was looking at a much shorter set of docs, and didn't see this property. Found better docs at: http://mottie.github.io/tablesorter/docs/#textextraction

HTML:

<table id="clipsTable" class="tablesorter">
    <thead>
        <tr>
            <th>Fake order</th>
            <th>Title</th>
            <th>Description</th>
            <th>Buttons</th>
        </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td>1</td>
            <td>Title for 1</td>
            <td>Description for 1</td>
            <td>
                <button>Hi guys</button>
                <input type="hidden" name="edit_clip_rank" value="4"/>
            </td>
        </tr>
        ...
    </tbody>
</table>

Javascript:

$("#clipsTable").tablesorter({
    headers: {
        0: { sorter: false },
        1: { sorter: false },
        2: { sorter: false },
        3: { sorter: false }
    },
    sortList: [ [3, 0] ],
    textExtraction: {
        3: function(node){
            return $(node).find("input[name='edit_clip_rank']").val();
        }
    }
});
share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There is a lot of excessive, unnecessary code in the solution. Try this (demo):

HTML

<table id="clipsTable" class="tablesorter">
    <thead>
        <tr>
            <th class="sorter-false">Fake order</th>
            <th class="sorter-false">Title</th>
            <th class="sorter-false">Description</th>
            <th class="sorter-false">Buttons</th>
        </tr>
    </thead>
    <tbody>
        <tr>
            <td>1</td>
            <td>Title for 1</td>
            <td>Description for 1</td>
            <td>
                <button>Hi guys</button>
                <input type="hidden" name="edit_clip_rank" value="4"/>
            </td>
        </tr>
        ...
    </tbody>
</table>

Script

$("#clipsTable").tablesorter({
    sortList: [ [3, 0] ],
    textExtraction: {
        3: function(node){
            return $(node).find('input[name]').val();
        }
    }
});

And if you use the textAttribute option instead of a hidden input, include a data-text attribute for that table cell (demo):

<td data-text="4">
    <button>Hi guys</button>
</td>

and use this script:

$("#clipsTable").tablesorter({
    sortList: [ [3, 0] ]
});
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah, I have a bad habit of forgetting to clear up old code that was written during early dev. But thanks for your more streamlined solutions. I've left the sorter: false flags in the javascript code though. Is it more efficient, programmatically, to have them as classes? I prefer to have them in the init code, so everything that has to do with setting up the tablesorter is located all in one location. Anyhow, thanks for all your help, Mottie! –  SteveFromAccounting Apr 23 '14 at 20:07
    
Using the sort-false class name is just a personal preference ;) and you're welcome! –  Mottie Apr 23 '14 at 22:41

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