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In general terms my program needs to run under these conditions:

A gambler has an initial capital of say $90 x0<-90

He plays a game so that the net result is 1 or -1

x <- x0 + sample(c(-1,1), 1, replace=T, prob=c(1-p,p))

where p=0.4

He continues to play until he either goes bankrupt or gets up $10

This is where I am running into trouble, I can't seem to continually run the sample and keep a running total that will keep looping until x equals 100 or 0, whichever comes first. (I intend to use p=0.4)

p<-0.4
x0<-90
t<-100




while((x !=100) & (x != 0))

    {
    x<- x0 + sample(c(-1,1), 1, replace=T, prob=c(1-p,p))

    gamblers.capital<-c(x0,x)


    }

basically I'm running into the problem of there only ever being 1 bet played. the capital will only go up or down by 1.

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Where does t <- 100 come in? What is it for? –  Richard Scriven Apr 22 at 16:53
    
You may be waiting a long while. Check how many 100s and 0s are in replicate(1e5, x0 + sample(c(-1,1), 1, replace=T, prob=c(1-p,p))) when p = 0.4 and x0 = 90. I get absolutely none. –  Richard Scriven Apr 22 at 17:11
    
Perhaps, you could take a large sample at the beggining and find afterwards the first (if any) 0 or 100 that occured? E.g. x1 = cumsum(c(90, sample(c(-1,1), 1e6, replace=T, prob=c(1-p,p)))); match(c(0, 100), x1). –  alexis_laz Apr 22 at 17:23

1 Answer 1

First of all, define gamblers.capital before the loop. Secondly, try with the repeat loop (use if and break) - this will imitate a repeat..until or do..while loop from other languages.

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Note that repeat can be dangerous, getting you trapped sometimes. –  Richard Scriven Apr 22 at 17:06
    
Indeed, so x should also be defined before the loop then. –  gagolews Apr 22 at 17:07
    
I think the OP needs to adjust a few things. Check how many 100s and 0s are in replicate(1e5, x0 + sample(c(-1,1), 1, replace=T, prob=c(1-p,p))) When p = 0.4 and x0 = 90. I get a big ol' zero. –  Richard Scriven Apr 22 at 17:10

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