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Got this from https://developers.google.com/speed/articles/javascript-dom

From what I understand, appending/removing elements causes reflow. As does changing class. But in the solution, you are appending and removing, thus, causing two times the number of reflows as the problem code. Of course, not all reflows are equal, so are class name change reflows more expensive than appending/removing reflows? What am I missing that makes the solution code more efficient than the problem code?

This pattern lets us create multiple elements and insert them into the DOM triggering a single reflow. It uses something called a DocumentFragment. We create a DocumentFragment outside of the DOM (so it is out-of-the-flow). We then create and add multiple elements to this. Finally, we move all elements in the DocumentFragment to the DOM but trigger a single reflow.

The problem

Let's make a function that changes the className attribute for all anchors within an element. We could do this by simply iterating through each anchor and updating their href attributes. The problems is, this can cause a reflow for each anchor.

function updateAllAnchors(element, anchorClass) {
  var anchors = element.getElementsByTagName('a');
  for (var i = 0, length = anchors.length; i < length; i ++) {
    anchors[i].className = anchorClass;
  }
}

The solution

To solve this problem, we can remove the element from the DOM, update all anchors, and then insert the element back where it was. To help achieve this, we can write a reusable function that not only removes an element from the DOM, but also returns a function that will insert the element back into its original position.

/**
 * Remove an element and provide a function that inserts it into its original position
 * @param element {Element} The element to be temporarily removed
 * @return {Function} A function that inserts the element into its original position
 **/
function removeToInsertLater(element) {
  var parentNode = element.parentNode;
  var nextSibling = element.nextSibling;
  parentNode.removeChild(element);
  return function() {
    if (nextSibling) {
      parentNode.insertBefore(element, nextSibling);
    } else {
      parentNode.appendChild(element);
    }
  };
}

Now we can use this function to update the anchors within an element that is out-of-the-flow, and only trigger a reflow when we remove the element and when we insert the element.

function updateAllAnchors(element, anchorClass) {
  var insertFunction = removeToInsertLater(element);
  var anchors = element.getElementsByTagName('a');
  for (var i = 0, length = anchors.length; i < length; i ++) {
    anchors[i].className = anchorClass;
  }
  insertFunction();
}
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Suppose you want to change classes of 1 million elements.

Doing it directly would cause 1 million reflows -one for each class-.

But if you remove its parent from the DOM, change all classes, and insert it back, that's only 2 reflows -because changing elements outside the document doesn't cause reflow-.

So basically, removing and reinserting is more efficient if you have lots of elements. No need to do it if you only have a few.

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So a document fragment lives 'in memory', not on the page. Manipulating that doesn't trigger any repaints/flows because the fragment is not visually represented anywhere. When you put it on the page, once you're done manipulating it, the browser knows its structure, classes, content, etc, so will only need to reflow/paint once.

In the first example, as you loop through the anchors and change the class name (presumably changing its style as well), it will immediately apply that class, find the new style, and repaint that link. Then do the same for the next one. This is slow.

By yanking it all out into memory and manipulating the DOM there, you only have one repaint/flow when you reinsert the parent wrapper element back into the page.

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According to the solution:

To solve this problem, we can remove the element from the DOM, update all anchors, and then insert the element back where it was.

So, in this case it will trigger 2 reflows (one for remove, and one for insert). So this solution applies when you want to modify more than 2 elements at a time.

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