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There are plenty of examples and tutorials on solving recurrence relations of the form of T(n) = T(n-1) + T(n-2) + O(n^k) or T(n) = a T(n/b) + O(n^k), with some initial conditions.

I'm trying to solve a recurrence relation that is a mix of these two forms, where: T(n) = T(n-2) + 2 T(n/2) with initial conditions T(0) = 1, T(1) = 1.

Any tips on how to solve this recurrence relation?

Thanks

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Isn't this more of a math problem? –  Lasse V. Karlsen Apr 22 '14 at 19:23

1 Answer 1

Use the substitution method. Well, let me back up a bit. The substitution method is for evaluating a guess, but the guess has to come from somewhere. I don't have much intuition about this recurrence, so I'll write down my process. I find it useful to look at the beginning of the sequence.

>>> def T(n):
...  if n==0: return 1
...  elif n==1: return 1
...  else: return T(n-2) + 2*T(n//2)
... 
>>> [T(n) for n in range(50)]
[1, 1, 3, 3, 9, 9, 15, 15, 33, 33, 51, 51, 81, 81, 111, 111, 177, 177, 243, 243, 345, 345, 447, 447, 609, 609, 771, 771, 993, 993, 1215, 1215, 1569, 1569, 1923, 1923, 2409, 2409, 2895, 2895, 3585, 3585, 4275, 4275, 5169, 5169, 6063, 6063, 7281, 7281]

The gaps between the numbers are getting bigger, so it's probably superlinear. On the other hand, it doesn't seem as though it's getting big fast enough to be exponential. Maybe it's polynomial. Then T(2*n)/T(n) should be bounded, but that doesn't seem to be happening.

>>> T(20)/T(10)
6.764705882352941
>>> T(50)/T(25)
13.955665024630543
>>> T(100)/T(50)
20.954112248499822
>>> T(200)/T(100)
35.791368360763435

This is the point where I start substituting to see what happens. Let's try 2^n.

T(0)  = 1 <= 2^0 = 1: check
T(1)  = 1 <= 2^1 = 2: check
T(n)  = T(n-2) + 2*T(n/2)
     <= 2^(n-2) + 2*2^(n/2)
      = 2^(n-2) + 2^(1 + n/2): FAIL,

since the proposition for n=2 would mean that 2^0 + 2^2 <= 2^2. This creates a "just missed" feeling in me because 1 + n/2 isn't close to n except when n is small. The bound 4^n in fact does work.

T(0)  = 1 <= 4^0 = 1: check
T(1)  = 1 <= 4^1 = 4: check
T(n)  = T(n-2) + 2*T(n/2)
     <= 4^(n-2) + 4^(1/2 + n/2)
     <= 4^(n-2) + 4^(n - 1/2)  [since n - 1/2 >= 1/2 + n/2 for n >= 2]
     <= 4^n: check

There are subtler ways to "fix" the bound, but anything of the form c^n still seems like the wrong idea: it's just wasteful to use 4^(n + O(1)) as a bound for 4^(n/2 + O(1)), a gut feeling that is backed up by the actual numbers above.

Let me show what happens when we attempt to bound by a polynomial, say n^100.

T(n)  = T(n-2) + 2*T(n/2)
     <= (n-2)^100 + 2*(n/2)^100
      = n^100 + O(n^99) + 2^-99*n^100 + O(n^99): FAIL,

since the constant on the n^100 is slightly too large. This is a sign that the bound won't work.

One of the simpler ways to get in between polynomial and exponential is a quasipolynomial like n^log(n) or n^(log(n)^2). Let's try the former.

T(n)  = T(n-2) + 2*T(n/2)
     <= n^log(n-2) + 2*((n/2)^log(n/2))
      = n^(log(n) + log(1 - 2/n)) + 2*((n/2)^(log(n) - 1))
      = n^(log(n) + ln(1 - 2/n)/ln(2)) + 2*((n/2)^(log(n) - 1))
     <= n^(log(n) - 2/(n*ln(2))) + n^(log(n) - 1) / 2^(log(n) - 2)
        [by log(1 + x) <= x, often written 1 + x <= e^x]
      = n^log(n) / n^(2/(n*ln(2))) + 4*n^log(n) / n^2

This looks promising. For all c > 0, the limit as n -> infinity of n^(c/n) = e^(c*ln(n)/n) is 1, and it approaches from above. All we have to do is get a bound n^(2/(n*ln(2))) >= 1/(1 - 4/n^2) = 1 + 4/n^2 + O(1/n^4), and we're set. Write

n^(c/n) = e^(c*ln(n)/n) >= 1 + c*ln(n)/n >= 1 + 4/n^2 + O(1/n^4) for large n.

It looks as though the complexity is quasipolynomial, though this proof has some loose ends. The statements that I proved asymptotically need to hold for all n, except they won't, so the constants need to be patched. These details tend to be tedious and not instructive. We also should prove a matching lower bound, but the analysis above is so tight that I'm confident that this can be done. I'm going to stop here, though.

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