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Input file contains .SYNC with incremental numbers: -.sync starts at position 1

 ----+----1----+----2----+----3---                           
 .SYNC 175                         
 UPDATE DB2DF36.RF_PROC_RATES     
 .SYNC 180                         
 UPDATE DB2DF36.RF_PROC_RATES     
 .SYNC 185                         
 UPDATE DB2DF36.RF_PROC_RATES     
 .SYNC 190                         
 UPDATE DB2DF36.RF_PROC_RATES     
 .SYNC 195                         
 UPDATE DB2DF36.RF_PROC_RATES

need to apply X all .sync or jcl sort in such a way that, it replaces the whole line of .SYNC with COMMIT;

Output:

 COMMIT;
 UPDATE DB2DF36.RF_PROC_RATES     
 COMMIT;                         
 UPDATE DB2DF36.RF_PROC_RATES     
 COMMIT;                         
 UPDATE DB2DF36.RF_PROC_RATES     
 COMMIT;                         
 UPDATE DB2DF36.RF_PROC_RATES     
 COMMIT;                        
 UPDATE DB2DF36.RF_PROC_RATES
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Any feedback, response, votes, accepts this time? –  Bill Woodger Apr 22 at 20:05

2 Answers 2

Why not try a simple REXX procedure. Something like:

/* REXX */
'EXECIO * DISKR INDD(FINIS'  /* Input dataset */
DO QUEUED()
   PARSE PULL TXT
   IF WORD(TXT, 1) = 'UPDATE' THEN DO
      QUEUE 'COMMIT;'
      QUEUE TXT
      END
   END
'EXECIO' QUEUED() 'DISKW OUTDD(FINIS' /* Output dataset */
EXIT

Save the above procedure in a PDS (e.g. USERID.MYREXX.EXEC(MYPROC)) then run it as part of your job. The JCL to run a REXX procedure is:

//TSOBATCH  EXEC PGM=IKJEFT01
//SYSEXEC   DD   DSN=USERID.MYREXX.EXEC,DISP=SHR
//INDD      DD   DSN=DATASET.TO.READ,DISP=SHR
//OUTDD     DD   DSN=DATASET.TO.WRITE,DISP=NEW...
//SYSTSPRT  DD   SYSOUT=A
//SYSTSIN   DD   *
 %MYPROC
/*
//

The above procedure reads the dataset assigned to INDD into its internal data queue. It then pulls in one record at a time (PARSE PULL TXT). If that line begins with the "word" UPDATE it then pushes out two lines, a COMMIT; followed by the line it just read. Finally it writes the queued records back to your new output dataset.

If the first word on an input line is not UPDATE then it just ignores that line and goes on to the next one.

share|improve this answer
    
Needs a little something to avoid the .SYNC nnn lines going out. –  Bill Woodger Apr 23 at 6:44
    
I did upvote, but I have to smile when I see you have more than mine. Using TSO is like kicking a dead whale down the beach as the saying goes. –  Bill Woodger Apr 23 at 8:49
    
@billwoodger The .SYNC lines are take care of (by ignoring them), only the UPDATE lines preceded by a COMMIT; are pushed back to the output dataset. Kicking a dead whale... I like to think of it as 'yet another way to skin a cat'. Both pretty grim analogies. BTW... this REXX procedure could be run directly under MVS batch using IRXJCL instead of IKJEFT01 as I used here. –  NealB Apr 23 at 13:29
    
Silly me. Didn't notice the IF. For me rexx is lower-case, COBOL upper. COBOL I always put in upper-case. I didn't lower-case your rexx... still no peep from @agent mahone, but nothing new there :-) –  Bill Woodger Apr 23 at 14:16
 OPTION COPY
 INREC IFTHEN=(WHEN=(1,5,CH,EQ,C'.SYNC'),
               OVERLAY=(C'COMMIT;',10X))

Tests for a value, uses OVERLAY to write over the top of the value.

The 10X you can amend, I don't know how long your sequence numbers are.

BUILD=(C'COMMIT;',80X)) can replace the OVERLAY, assuming a record-length of 80. Slightly more intensive use of CPU, but a lazy way to get it done.

It seems from re-reading your question that you might also want to do this with the ISPF editor.

If all your sequence numbers are three digits, you can do it in one shot:

c(hange) 1 p"$sync ###" "commit;"

This limits the position for the find part of the change to column 1, uses a Picture String which says "a speciali character, the letters "sync" (which will respect the CAPS setting), one space, and three numbers" will be changed to "commit;" (again respecting the setting of CAPS). You have to watch that ; is not your command delimiter and change it on option 0 on the primary panel if it is.

If your sequence numbers are longer/shorter as well, I don't think it can be done in one shot.

For safety, of course, you can exclude all the lines, f(find) the .sync (starting in column 1), then c(hange) p"#" " " all nx then change the .sync to commit, remembering all nx.

If you use the command delimiter (other than ;) you can do that all on one line (if you have space).

If you pickle it, there is UNDO, if you have enabled it.

There's a really useful thing in @NealB's answer. It is a concept people often have trouble grasping.

SOME STUFF
SOME OTHER STUFF
SOME STUFF
DIFFERENT STUFF
SOME STUFF
YET MORE DIFFERENT STUFF

Requirement is "All occurrences of SOME STUFF should be changed to BANANAS".

The useful thing is "toss away what we have so far but don't want, and put the new something in its place".

A different example is this one: http://stackoverflow.com/a/14607610/1927206

Move blank lines from the beginning of the file to the end of the file is the requirement.

That can be implemented by "getting rid of the blank lines at the start of the file and adding blank lines to the end of the file". "Oooh. I can't do that. I need the data, I just don't want it there...". It really is difficult from some to get the idea that "STUFF" when recorded on a record is exactly the same as the literal "STUFF" in a program.

So, here's an implementation for this case:

 OPTION COPY
 OMIT COND=(1,5,CH,EQ,C'.SYNC') oh my goodness, there goes my data!
 OUTFIL BUILD=(C'COMMIT;',80:X,
               /,
               1,80)

The /, the Slash Operator, is only available on BUILD in OUTFIL (don't, please, use OUTREC in OUTFIL, use BUILD for all new code) and generates a new record each time it is used.

As with NealB's, this assumes the data is in pairs of records. It tosses away the first of the pair, and then makes a new first of the pair before outputting the second.

It is often a good way to simplify processing. Not such benefit here, but since the technique came up...

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If using the ISPF editor, where semicolon is usually a command separator, you can use another character which doesn't appear in the file (let's say @) and then change it to hex 5e with: c p'$sync ===' 'commit@' all; c @ x'5e' all. –  Turophile Aug 20 at 3:57
    
@Turophile I just use the character I have for Logical Tabbing as the character to delimit the command line. –  Bill Woodger Aug 20 at 7:11

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