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I would like to send to a method a list of numbers, and to get in return all the possible combinations of numbers I gen generate from this list by putting the digits next to each other.

For example, for the numbers {1, 2, 3} I would to give in return:

{1, 2, 3, 12, 13, 21, 23, 31, 32, 123, 132, 213, 231, 312, 321}

This code for example (which I haven't finished) only "Knows" to deal with lists that contain 3 numbers in them.

private static void M1()
{
    var intList = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3 };
    var resultList = AllPossibleCombinations(intList);
}

private static object AllPossibleCombinations(List<int> List)
{
    var result = new List<int>();
    result.Add(List[0]);
    result.Add(List[1]);
    result.Add(List[2]);
    result.Add(List[0] * 10 + List[1]);
    result.Add(List[1] * 10 + List[2]);
    result.Add(List[0] * 10 + List[2]);
    result.Add(List[1] * 10 + List[0]);
    result.Add(List[2] * 10 + List[1]);
    result.Add(List[2] * 10 + List[0]);
    return result;
}

How can I write something more generic? How can I get a list with different number of elements and give in return all the possible combinations?

share|improve this question
4  
What research have you done on this topic? Solutions to this problem are readily available as it is a reasonably common problem. – Servy Apr 22 '14 at 19:22
    
there are a possible of N! + N((N-1)!) + N((N-2)!) + ... (3*2*1 + 3(2*1) + 3(1))orderings, so, you can loop through that many times and taking into account digit length. Or use recursion in some fashion. – Benjamin Trent Apr 22 '14 at 19:25
    
Just thought about it not long ago. I wonder if their is such a special class that know how to deal with combination, or if someone here knows a method to deal with this problem. – asker22 Apr 22 '14 at 19:26
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This isn't necessarily the most efficient, but here's how you could do this using non-recursive methods returning IEnumerable<T>. Something like this will probably require the least possible memory, since it doesn't require building all the permutations in memory. Instead, it just allows you to iterate over the permutations one by one.

private static void Main()
{
    var input1 = new[] {"1", "2", "3"};
    foreach (var output in EnumeratePermutations(input1))
        Debug.WriteLine(String.Join(",", output));
}

private static IEnumerable<T[]> EnumeratePermutations<T>(T[] input)
{
    return from partCount in Enumerable.Range(1, input.Length)
            let inputs = Enumerable.Repeat(input, partCount).ToArray()
            from indices in EnumerateCrossjoinIndices(inputs)
            where indices.Distinct().Count() == indices.Length
            select indices.Select(n => input[n]).ToArray();
}

private static IEnumerable<int[]> EnumerateCrossjoinIndices(params Array[] arrays)
{
    var arrayCount = arrays.Length;
    if (arrayCount == 0)
        yield break;

    if (arrays.Any(a => a.Length == 0))
        yield break;

    var indexer = new int[arrayCount];

    yield return (int[]) indexer.Clone();

    for (var dimension = arrayCount - 1; dimension >= 0; --dimension)
    {
        ++indexer[dimension];
        if (indexer[dimension] == arrays[dimension].Length)
            indexer[dimension] = 0;
        else
        {
            yield return (int[]) indexer.Clone();
            dimension = arrayCount;
        }
    }
}

EnumerateCrossjoinIndices takes n arrays of potentially different lengths and yields an enumeration of the indices that would be used in a crossjoin operation. For example, given {"1","2"} and {"A","B","C"}, it would yield 6 arrays {0,0}, {0,1}, {0,2}, {1,0}, {1,1}, {1,2}. Note that the arrays yielded by this method contain indices into the input arrays, not the elements at those indices.

EnumeratePermutations takes an array and yields the permutations of the items of that array. It does this by enumerating over the indices that would be used to crossjoin the array against itself x times (where x = 1 to n, where n is the number of items in the array). It then filters out any set of crossjoin indices where the set isn't a distinct set.

share|improve this answer
    
Note that I just updated this to allow non-distinct arrays to be used as inputs. – Michael Gunter Apr 22 '14 at 20:46
    
I like your code, but it has a small bug. Try sending EnumeratePermutations metod this array: ("a","b","c","e","e"). In the result list you will find abcee twice, as well as other strings. How do you write a code that "knows" how to ignore the same combinations? – asker22 Apr 26 '14 at 19:20
    
@asker22: This is actually by design, as per my comment right before yours. The code above specifically treats each item as distinct even if they are equal. Therefore "e" (item 4) and "e" (item 5) in the original list are considered different items. When you see permutations that have "e" twice, it's because one of them is item 4 and one of them is item 5. – Michael Gunter May 2 '14 at 15:25

Try this sample code:

private static List<int> AllPossibleCombinations(IList<int> alphabet)
{
    List<int[]> combinations = new List<int[]>();
    MakeCombination(combinations, alphabet.Count, new int[0]); // Start recursion
    combinations.RemoveAt(0);   // Remove empty combination
    return combinations.ConvertAll(c => c.Aggregate(0, (sum, index) => sum * 10 + alphabet[index]));
}

private static void MakeCombination(List<int[]> output, int length, int[] usedIndices)
{
    output.Add(usedIndices);
    for (int i = 0; i < length; i++)
        if (Array.IndexOf(usedIndices, i) == -1)    // If the index wasn't used earlier
        {
            // Add element to the array of indices by creating a new one:
            int[] indices = new int[usedIndices.Length + 1];
            usedIndices.CopyTo(indices, 0);
            indices[usedIndices.Length] = i;

            if (length + 1 != indices.Length)
                MakeCombination(output, length, indices);  // Recursion
        }
}

It uses recursion to generate desired combinations.

Usage:

var t = AllPossibleCombinations(new[] { 1, 2, 3 });
share|improve this answer

Solution 1

The more generic and type independent way is to create tree-based algorithm which returns collection of combinations of input objects.

Code:

public static class IEnumerableExtensions
{
    private class Node<T>
    {
        public Node()
        {
            Children = new List<Node<T>>();
        }

        public T Value
        {
            get;
            set;
        }

        public bool IsRoot
        {
            get;
            set;
        }

        public List<Node<T>> Children
        {
            get;
            private set;
        }

        public Node<T> Parent
        {
            get;
            set;
        }

        public List<Node<T>> Path
        {
            get
            {
                List<Node<T>> Result = new List<Node<T>>();

                Result.Add(this);

                if (this.Parent.IsRoot == false)
                {
                    Result.AddRange(this.Parent.Path);
                }

                return Result;
            }
        }
    }

    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> Combinations<T>(this IEnumerable<T> enumerable)
    {
        List<Node<T>> AllNodes = new List<Node<T>>();

        // Create tree.
        Node<T> Root = new Node<T>() { IsRoot = true };
        Queue<Node<T>> Queue = new Queue<Node<T>>();
        Queue.Enqueue(Root);

        int CurrentLevel = 0;
        int LevelsToCreate = enumerable.Count();
        while (Queue.Count > 0)
        {
            var CurrentLevelNodes = Queue.ToList();
            Queue.Clear();

            foreach (var LoopNode in CurrentLevelNodes)
            {
                if (LoopNode.Children.Count == 0)
                {
                    foreach (var LoopValue in enumerable)
                    {
                        var NewNode = new Node<T>() { Value = LoopValue, Parent = LoopNode };
                        AllNodes.Add(NewNode);
                        LoopNode.Children.Add(NewNode);
                        Queue.Enqueue(NewNode);
                    }
                }
            }

            CurrentLevel++;
            if (CurrentLevel >= LevelsToCreate)
            {
                break;
            }
        }

        // Return list of all paths (which are combinations).
        List<List<T>> Result = new List<List<T>>();
        foreach (var LoopNode in AllNodes)
        {
            if (!LoopNode.IsRoot)
            {
                List<T> Combination = LoopNode.Path.Select(Item => Item.Value).ToList();
                Result.Add(Combination);
            }
        }

        return Result;
    }
}

Example with numbers:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        List<int> Input = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3 };
        var Combinations = Input.Combinations();
    }
}

Example with strings:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var Input = new List<string>() { "a", "b" };
        var Combinations = Input.Combinations();


        foreach (var LoopCombination in Combinations)
        {
            string Combination = string.Join(String.Empty, LoopCombination);
            Console.WriteLine(Combination);
        }

        Console.ReadKey();
    }

Solution 2

The second idea is to not to use tree-based algorithm and create combinations step-by-step - it may be faster.

Code:

public class Combinator<T>
{
    private readonly Dictionary<int, T> _Pattern;
    private readonly int _Min = 0;
    private readonly int _Max;

    private List<int> _CurrentCombination;

    public Combinator(IEnumerable<T> pattern)
    {
        _Pattern = new Dictionary<int, T>();
        for (int i = 0; i < pattern.Count(); i++)
        {
            _Pattern.Add(i, pattern.ElementAt(i));
        }

        _CurrentCombination = new List<int>();
        _Max = pattern.Count() - 1;
    }

    public bool HasFinised
    {
        get;
        private set;
    }

    public IEnumerable<T> Next()
    {
        // Initialize or increase.
        if (_CurrentCombination.Count == 0)
        {
            _CurrentCombination.Add(_Min);
        }
        else
        {
            MyIncrease(_CurrentCombination.Count - 1);
        }

        if (_CurrentCombination.Count - 1 == _Max && _CurrentCombination.All(Key => Key == _Max))
        {
            HasFinised = true;
        }

        return _CurrentCombination.Select(Key => _Pattern[Key]).ToList();;
    }

    private void MyIncrease(int index)
    {
        if (index >= 0)
        {
            _CurrentCombination[index] = _CurrentCombination[index] + 1;

            if (_CurrentCombination[index] > _Max)
            {
                _CurrentCombination[index] = _Min;

                if (index - 1 < 0)
                {
                    _CurrentCombination.Insert(0, -1);
                    index++;
                }

                MyIncrease(index - 1);
            }
        }
    }
}

Example:

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        var Pattern = new List<string>() { "a", "b", "c" };
        Combinator<string> Combinator = new Combinator<string>(Pattern);

        while (Combinator.HasFinised == false)
        {
            var Combined = Combinator.Next();
            var Joined = string.Join("-", Combined);
            Console.WriteLine(Joined);
        }

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
}

If you want to combine items with others only:

    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Combinator<int> Combinator = new Combinator<int>(new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3 });

        while (Combinator.HasFinised == false)
        {
            var NextCombination = Combinator.Next();
            var DistinctCheck = NextCombination.ToList().Distinct();
            if (DistinctCheck.Count() == NextCombination.Count())
            {
                Console.WriteLine(string.Join(String.Empty, NextCombination.Select(Item => Item.ToString())));
            }                
        }

        Console.ReadKey();
    }
share|improve this answer
    
I tested your code and found something that I wasn't looking to find. For the list ("a","b","c") your code return the string aaa bbb and ccc. I want for each element in the list to be combined to others, not to himself. – asker22 Apr 26 '14 at 19:09
    
Just skip repeating elements. – Rakoo Apr 26 '14 at 20:06

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