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I've put together the following rudimentary stopwatch in Racket (just learning now, the final aim is a pomodoro-timer).

#lang racket

(define start-time 0)
(define end-times '())

(define (start);; stores start-time
  (set! start-time (current-seconds)))

(define (lap);; stores "laps" in list
  (set! end-times (cons (current-seconds) end-times)))

(define (stop);; stores final time, displays lap-times in h, m, s and resets end-times
  (begin
    (set! end-times (cons (current-seconds) end-times))
    (display
     (reverse
      (map (lambda (an-end)
             (let ((the-date (seconds->date(- an-end start-time))))
               (list
                (sub1(date-hour the-date))
                ;; sub1 is needed because (date-hour(seconds->date 0) = 1
                (date-minute the-date)
                (date-second the-date)))) end-times)))
    (set! end-times '())
    ))

While this does exactly what it should, I was wondering how I could avoid mutable state. If I follow HTDP, this is the kind of situation where mutable state is warranted, but after browsing Wadler's "Monads for Functional Programming", I'm still curious about how I could do without set!.

I know that to make it functional, I should add arguments to my functions. For instance, start would become

(define (start [now (current-seconds)])
  now)

and a similar approach could work with lap and stop.

Still, while I know that after adding additional arguments to restore functionality, I should also pass arguments rather than storing values in variables, I don't see how in this case I can leverage this to avoid set! as well.

Update: Since all three answers below are highly valuable (thanks!), I didn't mark any of them as the unique correct one. Below is the minimal solution to my initial question. It is a combination of the loop-proposal of @Metaxal, with the example-usage of @Greg Hendershott.

#lang racket

(define (run)
  (displayln "Enter 'lap' or 'quit':")
  (let loop ([t0 (current-seconds)] [times '()])
    (match (read-line)
      ["quit" (reverse
      (map (lambda (x)
             (let ((the-date (seconds->date x)))
               (list
                (sub1(date-hour the-date))
                (date-minute the-date)
                (date-second the-date)))) times))]
      ["lap" (loop t0 (cons (- (current-seconds) t0) times))]
      [_ (loop t0 times)])))
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3 Answers 3

What will likely happen in the following of your program is that you will have a loop. Then this loop can be a function that takes as input the whole current state, and when you want to update its state, just call the loop again with the new state (you may also call the loop again with the same exact state of course).

Simplified example:

(define (loop [t0 (current-seconds)] [times '()])
  ;; ... do things here, possibly depending on user input ...
  ;; then loop with a new state:
  (cond [<some-start-condition> (loop (current-seconds) '())]
        [<some-lap-condition>   (loop t0 (cons (- (current-seconds) t0) times))]
        [<some-stop-condition>  times])) ; stop, no loop, return value

This certainly changes the approach to your design though.

It's harder to use this approach when designing GUI programs, because the event loop often prevents you from (or makes it difficult) passing values from one event to the next. However, in Racket, there is (the pedagogical, but still very good) big-bang that is made just for that.

share|improve this answer
    
This is, in the strictest sense, an answer to my question. (see my edit for how I've put it to use by combining it with the usage example from @Greg Hendershot) –  user2818584 Apr 23 '14 at 19:45

In this case using set! is justified and hard to avoid, because we must "remember" state between invocations of the procedures. What we can do is improving the encapsulation of state, by hiding the variables that change inside a procedure and using a message dispatcher for accessing the procedures that refer to the mutable state. This is very similar to what we do with object-oriented programming, but only lambdas are required to implement it!

(define (make-timer)

  ; the "attributes" of the object

  (let ([start-time  0]
        [end-times '()])

    ; the "methods" of the object

    (define (start)
      (set! start-time (current-seconds)))

    (define (lap)
      (set! end-times (append end-times (list (current-seconds)))))

    (define (stop)
      (lap)
      (display
       (map (lambda (an-end)
              (let ((the-date (seconds->date (- an-end start-time))))
                (list
                 (sub1 (date-hour the-date))
                 (date-minute the-date)
                 (date-second the-date))))
            end-times))
      (set! end-times '()))

    ; return a dispatch procedure

    (lambda (msg)
      (case msg
        ((start) (start)) ; call the start procedure defined above
        ((lap)   (lap))   ; call the lap procedure defined above
        ((stop)  (stop))  ; call the stop procedure defined above
        (else (error "unknown message:" msg))))))

I took the liberty of modifying some of your procedures to make them a bit simpler. Here's how we would use the timer object we just created:

(define timer (make-timer))

(timer 'start)
(sleep 1)
(timer 'lap)
(sleep 1)
(timer 'lap)
(sleep 1)
(timer 'lap)
(sleep 1)
(timer 'stop)

=> ((18 0 1) (18 0 2) (18 0 3) (18 0 4))

This technique is called "message passing", learn more about it in the wonderful SICP book.

share|improve this answer
    
I'll get back to SICP! –  user2818584 Apr 23 '14 at 19:45

For a simple example like this, I would probably do what @Metaxal suggested.

However another approach is that you could explicitly define the state as a struct:

(struct state (start-time end-times))

Then change the start, lap, and stop to be functions on state:

;; start : -> state
;; stores start-time
(define (start)
  (state (current-seconds) '()))

;; lap : state -> state
;; stores "laps" in list
(define (lap st)
  (match-define (state start-time end-times) st)
  (state start-time
         (cons (current-seconds) end-times)))

;; stop : state -> list
;; stores final time, displays lap-times in h, m, s
(define (stop st)
  (match-define (state start-time end-times*) st)
  (define end-times (cons (current-seconds) end-times*))
  (reverse
   (map (lambda (an-end)
          (let ((the-date (seconds->date(- an-end start-time))))
            (list
             (sub1(date-hour the-date))
             ;; sub1 is needed because (date-hour(seconds->date 0) = 1
             (date-minute the-date)
             (date-second the-date)))) end-times)))

As in @Metaxal's answer, your "main loop" needs to handle the state and "thread" it through the functions as appropriate:

Example usage:

(define (run)
  (displayln "Enter 'lap' or 'quit':")
  (let loop ([st (start)])
    (match (read-line)
      ["quit" (stop st)]
      ["lap" (loop (lap st))]
      [_ (loop st)])))

Whereas @Óscar López's answer shows a style of OOP as explained in SICP.

A nice thing about Racket (and Scheme) is that you can choose whatever approach on the spectrum you think best fits the problem at hand, and your taste -- simple imperative, OOP imperative, pure functional.

share|improve this answer
    
As it turns out, the use of (read-line) was one of the simple things I didn't think about, and this prevented me from getting it all right. –  user2818584 Apr 23 '14 at 19:46

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