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Okay I have updated my code quite a bit. I am getting a new problem, but it seems to be on a correct path. Now when I enter in the numbers it just continually spits out the first number I entered instead of moving to the next number.

main.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <cType.h>
#include "list.h"


#define amount 3 

//Prototypes
void printList(LIST* number);

int main(){
    int i;
    int* dataPtr;
    int number;

    LIST* numberList;
    numberList = createList();

    printf("Please enter %d numbers for the linked list\n", amount);

    for(i = 0; i < amount; i++){
          printf("#%d: ", i+1);
          scanf("%d", &number);
          dataPtr = malloc(sizeof(int));
          *dataPtr = number;
          addNode(numberList, dataPtr);
    }
    printList(numberList);
    system("PAUSE");    
    return 0;
}

void printList(LIST* number){
     int* dataPtr;
     while (!emptyList(number)){
           traverse(number,0, (void*)&dataPtr);
           printf("%d\n", *dataPtr);
           addNode(number, dataPtr);
     }
}

list.h

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <cType.h>

//List ADT Type Definitions
typedef struct node{
        void* dataPtr;
        struct node* link;
        } NODE;

typedef struct{
        int count;
        NODE* pos;
        NODE* head;
        NODE* rear;
        } LIST;
//Prototype Declarations
LIST* ceateList(void);

bool traverse (LIST* pList, int fromWhere, void** dataOutPtr);

int listCount (LIST* pList);
bool emptyList (LIST* pList);
bool fullList (LIST* pList);

bool addNode (LIST* pList, void* dataInPtr);

list.c

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <stdbool.h>
#include <cType.h>

#include "list.h"

LIST* createList(void){
      LIST* list;

      list = (LIST*) malloc (sizeof(list));

      if(list){
               list->head = NULL;

               list->rear = NULL;
               list->count = 0;
      }
      return list;
}

bool addNode(LIST* pList, void* dataInPtr){
       NODE* pNew;

       if(!(pNew = (NODE*) malloc(sizeof(NODE))))
                 return false;

       pNew->dataPtr = dataInPtr;
       pNew->link =  NULL;

       if(pList->count == 0){
               pNew->link = pList->head;
               pList->head = pNew;
               if(pList->count == 0)
                 pList->rear = pNew;
       }
       else{
            pNew->link = pNew;

            if(pNew->link == NULL)
               pList->rear = pNew;
       }
       (pList->count)++;
       return true;
}


bool emptyList(LIST* pList){
     return(pList->count == 0);
}

bool fullList(LIST* pList){
     NODE* temp;

     if((temp = (NODE*)malloc(sizeof(*(pList->head))))){
              free(temp);
              return false;
     }
     return true;
}

int listCount(LIST* pList){
    return pList->count;
}

bool traverse(LIST* pList, int fromWhere, void** dataPtrOut){
     if(pList->count == 0)
                     return false;

     if(fromWhere == 0){
                  pList->pos = pList->head;
                  *dataPtrOut = pList->pos->dataPtr;
                  return true;
     }
     else{
          if (pList->pos->link == NULL)
             return false;
          else{
               pList->pos = pList->pos->link;
               *dataPtrOut = pList->pos->dataPtr;
               return true;
          }
     }
}
share|improve this question
    
Homework question? –  Tronic Feb 24 '10 at 1:49
    
practice question. I do not turn these in for grades –  shinjuo Feb 24 '10 at 1:51
    
The linked list you have is somewhat confusing. You have pointers to head and rear, but the nodes only contains a forward link. Hungarian notation (p in front of variable names) and all-uppercase type names are bad style. It is old Microsoft style, but nowadays Microsoft (for .NET at least), Linus Torvalds and Bjarne Stroustrup are against it. –  Tronic Feb 24 '10 at 2:01
    
It is coming from a data structures and algorithms book –  shinjuo Feb 24 '10 at 2:07
    
It seems that my traverse is screwed up –  shinjuo Feb 24 '10 at 2:47
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When you call _insert() you havn't initialized pPre. In C, uninitialized memory is not nessescarily NULL.

Also, if I were you I'd remove the pos pointer from the LIST type - using it makes your code very much not reentrant.

share|improve this answer
    
How would you initialize it? as for the pos pointer I need that for the position. –  shinjuo Feb 24 '10 at 2:12
    
like this pPre = malloc(sizeof(NODE));? –  shinjuo Feb 24 '10 at 2:15
    
no. Your _insert method expets a pointer to the location where it should insert the new data. Where do you want to insert the new data? at the beginning of the list? At the end? In the middle? –  gnud Feb 24 '10 at 2:22
    
hmmm I think I will just pull that part out then. A linked list doesnt necessarily need that does it? if it does how can I fix what you said? –  shinjuo Feb 24 '10 at 2:27
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list = (LIST*) malloc (sizeof(list));

You have the size of a pointer, not that of a struct.

share|improve this answer
    
what do you mean? –  shinjuo Feb 24 '10 at 1:56
    
sizeof(list) == sizeof(LIST*) == sizeof(void*) != sizeof(LIST) –  gnud Feb 24 '10 at 1:57
    
would I just put that right after list = (LIST*) malloc (sizeof(list));? –  shinjuo Feb 24 '10 at 2:04
    
eh, no. You would replace your line with list = malloc(sizeof(LIST)); –  gnud Feb 24 '10 at 2:08
    
still crashes after I input the amount of desired numbers. The program takes in the 5 numbers and then sits and crashes –  shinjuo Feb 24 '10 at 2:13
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I think learning to use a debugger would be a good idea. It is an essential piece of any devs skill set.

If this is on a Linux system using gcc (most likely) then compile the code with -g and run it using gdb. If you need more guidance on this then says so

PS: I agree with earlier poster that you should not use all caps variable names. Traditionally all caps are for macros and constants

share|improve this answer
    
I am using dev C++ to compile my program. As for the way the variables are, as I said they base of this is being copied from my Data structures and algorithms book. I just happen to be changing the program that it went to originally –  shinjuo Feb 24 '10 at 2:56
    
i dont know what 'Dev c++' is - does it have a debugger? –  pm100 Feb 24 '10 at 2:59
    
yes but I am not sure how to use it –  shinjuo Feb 24 '10 at 3:04
    
learning how to use it is a good investment in your time. It is always interesting and sometimes surprising to watch your code running in a debugger –  pm100 Feb 24 '10 at 3:40
    
I will do that. I am a little surprised I have never had a teacher make us learn it. This is my fifth programing class –  shinjuo Feb 24 '10 at 5:50
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