Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Recently i implemented a simple Opengl program that composes of a scene of objects, i've applied most of the transformation & projection matrices, in such away that i am able to rotate transform & scale objects, move my camera through z & x coordinates and applied perspective projection however when it comes to camera rotation things get weird, my rotation matrix for my camera is simply a rotation matrix that rotates the world uniformly, however when i rotate the world so that i look in the up direction;+y; and when i move forward, the camera doesn't seem to advance in the direction where it is looking at;as it is the case in FPS games my camera moves relative to the world space, i know that i am missing the vectors that specify directions in x,y,z coordinates, but i am unable to incorporate these vectors with my camera (view Transformation) matrix, most of the tutorial on internet either describes it in a block diagram or uses the conventional gluLookAt() function, i really need a brief explanation about view Transformations and specifically camera rotation and how i should implement it in my matrices, my my final matrix is as follows:

resultTransform = perspectiveTrans * cameraTrans * modelTrans;

where:

perspectiveTrans = applies only a perspective projection transformation

cameraTrans = is a combination of rotate,translate matrices that affect all obj.s in the scene

modelTrans =is the transformation that is applied to the models

Matrix4X4.cpp file:

#include "Matrix4X4.h"

using namespace std;


////////////////////////////////// Constructor Declerations ////////////////////////////////

Matrix4X4::Matrix4X4()
{
setIdentity();
}

Matrix4X4::Matrix4X4(float value)
{
for(int i = 0 ; i < 4; i++)
    for ( int j = 0; j < 4; j++)
        Matrix[i][j] = value;

}

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////







////////////////////////////// Destructor Decleration //////////////////////////////
Matrix4X4::~Matrix4X4()
{

}

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////







/////////////////////// Set Identity Matrix /////////////////////////////////////////

void Matrix4X4::setIdentity()
{
Matrix[0][0] =1;   Matrix[0][1] = 0;  Matrix[0][2] = 0;      Matrix[0][3] = 0;
Matrix[1][0] =0;   Matrix[1][1] = 1;  Matrix[1][2] = 0;      Matrix[1][3] = 0;
Matrix[2][0] =0;   Matrix[2][1] = 0;  Matrix[2][2] = 1;      Matrix[2][3] = 0;
Matrix[3][0] =0;   Matrix[3][1] = 0;  Matrix[3][2] = 0;      Matrix[3][3] = 1;


}

///////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////






///////////////////////// Set Translation Matrix //////////////////////////////////

Matrix4X4 Matrix4X4::setTranslation(float x,float y,float z)
{


Matrix[0][0] =1;   Matrix[0][1] = 0;  Matrix[0][2] = 0;      Matrix[0][3] = x;
Matrix[1][0] =0;   Matrix[1][1] = 1;  Matrix[1][2] = 0;      Matrix[1][3] = y;
Matrix[2][0] =0;   Matrix[2][1] = 0;  Matrix[2][2] = 1;      Matrix[2][3] = z;
Matrix[3][0] =0;   Matrix[3][1] = 0;  Matrix[3][2] = 0;      Matrix[3][3] = 1;

return  *this;

}
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////





////////////////////////////////////// Set Rotation Matrix     ///////////////////////////////////////////

Matrix4X4 Matrix4X4::setRotation(float x,float y,float z)
{
Matrix4X4 xRot;
Matrix4X4 yRot;
Matrix4X4 zRot;

x = (float)x * 3.14/ 180.0;
y = (float)y * 3.14/ 180.0;
z = (float)z * 3.14/ 180.0;



xRot.Matrix[0][0] =1;         xRot.Matrix[0][1] = 0;        xRot.Matrix[0][2] = 0;            xRot.Matrix[0][3] = 0;
xRot.Matrix[1][0] =0;         xRot.Matrix[1][1] = cosf(x);  xRot.Matrix[1][2] = -sinf(x);   xRot.Matrix[1][3] = 0;
xRot.Matrix[2][0] =0;         xRot.Matrix[2][1] = sinf(x);  xRot.Matrix[2][2] = cosf(x);    xRot.Matrix[2][3] = 0;
xRot.Matrix[3][0] =0;         xRot.Matrix[3][1] = 0;        xRot.Matrix[3][2] = 0;          xRot.Matrix[3][3] = 1;

yRot.Matrix[0][0] = cosf(y);  yRot.Matrix[0][1] = 0;        yRot.Matrix[0][2] = -sinf(y);   yRot.Matrix[0][3] = 0;
yRot.Matrix[1][0] =0;         yRot.Matrix[1][1] = 1;        yRot.Matrix[1][2] = 0;          yRot.Matrix[1][3] = 0;
yRot.Matrix[2][0] = sinf(y);  yRot.Matrix[2][1] = 0;        yRot.Matrix[2][2] = cosf(y);    yRot.Matrix[2][3] = 0;
yRot.Matrix[3][0] =0;         yRot.Matrix[3][1] = 0;        yRot.Matrix[3][2] = 0;          yRot.Matrix[3][3] = 1;

zRot.Matrix[0][0] = cosf(z);  zRot.Matrix[0][1] = -sinf(z); zRot.Matrix[0][2] = 0;          zRot.Matrix[0][3] = 0;
zRot.Matrix[1][0] = sinf(z);  zRot.Matrix[1][1] = cosf(z);  zRot.Matrix[1][2] = 0;          zRot.Matrix[1][3] = 0;
zRot.Matrix[2][0] =0;         zRot.Matrix[2][1] = 0;        zRot.Matrix[2][2] = 1;          zRot.Matrix[2][3] = 0;
zRot.Matrix[3][0] =0;         zRot.Matrix[3][1] = 0;        zRot.Matrix[3][2] = 0;          zRot.Matrix[3][3] = 1;


return (zRot * yRot * xRot) ;

}

////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////






//////////////////////////////////////// Set Scale Matrix //////////////////////////////////////////

Matrix4X4 Matrix4X4::setScale(float x,float y,float z)
{


Matrix[0][0] =x;   Matrix[0][1] = 0;  Matrix[0][2] = 0;      Matrix[0][3] = 0;
Matrix[1][0] =0;   Matrix[1][1] = y;  Matrix[1][2] = 0;      Matrix[1][3] = 0;
Matrix[2][0] =0;   Matrix[2][1] = 0;  Matrix[2][2] = z;      Matrix[2][3] = 0;
Matrix[3][0] =0;   Matrix[3][1] = 0;  Matrix[3][2] = 0;      Matrix[3][3] = 1;

return *this;
}

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////





///////////////////////////////// Set Perspective Projection ///////////////////////////////////////

void Matrix4X4::setPerspective(float fov,float aRatio,float zNear,float zFar)
{


fov = (fov/2) * 3.14 / 180.0;
float tanHalfFOV = tanf(fov);
float zRange = zNear - zFar;


 Matrix[0][0] =1.0f / (tanHalfFOV * aRatio);   Matrix[0][1] = 0;                  Matrix[0][2] = 0;                         Matrix[0][3] = 0;
 Matrix[1][0] =0;                              Matrix[1][1] = 1.0f / tanHalfFOV;  Matrix[1][2] = 0;                         Matrix[1][3] = 0;
 Matrix[2][0] =0;                              Matrix[2][1] = 0;                  Matrix[2][2] = (-zNear - zFar)/ zRange;   Matrix[2][3] = 2* zFar * zNear / zRange;
 Matrix[3][0] =0;                              Matrix[3][1] = 0;                  Matrix[3][2] = 1;                         Matrix[3][3] = 0;



}
/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////





////////////////////////////////////// Getters & Setters ////////////////////////////////////////////

float * Matrix4X4::getMat()
{
return (float *) Matrix;
}


float Matrix4X4::getMember(int x, int y) const
{
return Matrix[x][y];
}


void Matrix4X4::setMat(int row,int col,float value)
{
Matrix[row][col] = value;
}

/////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////






/////////////////////////////////////// (*) Operator Overload //////////////////////////////////////

Matrix4X4 operator * (const Matrix4X4 & lhs,const Matrix4X4 & rhs)
{

Matrix4X4 result;

    for(int i = 0 ; i < 4; i++)
        for ( int j = 0; j < 4; j++)
            result.setMat(i, j,  lhs.getMember(i,0) * rhs.getMember(0, j) +
                            lhs.getMember(i,1) * rhs.getMember(1, j) +
                            lhs.getMember(i,2) * rhs.getMember(2, j) +
                            lhs.getMember(i,3) * rhs.getMember(3, j));


        return result;
}
//////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

the Transformation code i use in my main block:

        SDL_PumpEvents();

        for (int x = 0; x< 256; x++)
        {
            if (state[x] == 1 )
            {
                if(x  == 26)
                    tranForward -= 0.001;
                if (x == 22)
                    tranForward += 0.001;
                if (x == 4)
                    tranRight += 0.0009;
                if (x == 7)
                    tranRight -= 0.0009;

                if (x == 82)
                    lookUp += 0.02;
                if (x == 81)
                    lookUp -= 0.02;
                if (x == 80)
                    lookRight -= 0.02;
                if (x == 79)
                    lookRight += 0.02;
            }
        }





        modelTrans =  Translation.setTranslation(0, 0, 5) * Scale.setScale(0.5, 0.5, 0.5);
        camTrans   =  Rotation.setRotation(lookUp, lookRight, 0) * Translation.setTranslation(tranRight, 0, tranForward);
        Projection.setPerspective(70, win.getWidth()/win.getHeight(), 0.1, 1000);


        result =  Projection * camTrans * modelTrans;




       glUniformMatrix4fv(uniformloc, 1, GL_TRUE, result.getMat());
share|improve this question
    
Without seeing specific code, my best guess would be that your camera rotation and translation are occurring in the wrong order. Doing a rotation and then a translation does not have the same effect as doing a translation then a rotation. – user3256930 Apr 22 '14 at 22:53
    
@user3256930 i added my matrix class and transformation multiplication code, i use a custom matrix class with operator overload. – BulBul Apr 22 '14 at 23:03
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The matrix multiplication does not have the same rules as the scalar multiplication and in your case A*B does NOT equal B*A when multiplying the matrices. If rest of the code is good your solution might simply be turning

result =  Projection * camTrans * modelTrans;

into

result =  Projection * (modelTrans * camTrans);

Do alway watch out for both, multiplication order and parentheses when dealing with anything but scalar values.

In general when you are combining a translation and rotation matrix you need to think in matrix own space coordinate system, that means like playing a FPS:

Multiplying rotation*translation means the object will rotate first and then translate meaning the object position will depend on the rotation being already applied and a 180 degrees rotation will translate the object backwards from the 3rd view perspective.

Multiplying translation*rotation means the object will translate first and then rotate meaning it will in fact be moved into the same direction no matter the rotation, only the direction of where the object is facing will be changed by rotation matrix.

Just a nice example, if you want to present a movement of earth around sun (the earth is circling the sun while rotating around its own axis being on some radius):

    Matrix4X4 orbitRotation; //rotation matrix for where in orbit the object is
    Matrix4X4 objectRotation; //object rotation around its own axis
    Matrix4X4 orbitRadius; //object orbit radius

    Matrix4X4 result = (orbitRotation*orbitRadius)*objectRotation;
share|improve this answer
    
I think that is not the case, i've tried all combinations of multiplication order, the problem still exist, i think it relates to the camera rotation matrix that doesn't know where the up,front, & side vectors are,thus the transformation from world space to camera space fails. – BulBul Apr 23 '14 at 12:57
    
Why do you set the matrix on every input, you need to update it. Try doing result = result * camTrans * modelTrans; and then when you set the matrix call Projection*result. Also those tranForward and alike parameters are to be removed, they must not be incremented but fixed depending on the input (for instance the length of the mouse drag path). – Matic Oblak Apr 24 '14 at 6:54
    
Oblack i did as you said not it has some strange behavior and the object fades immediately after i hold the w (Forward) button, do you have any good example or online tutorial that involves such kind of rotation for view transformation, i mean a rotation matrix that uses Euler's rotation without using quaternions, or at least you may guide me through a simple code , any help would be very appreciated, thanks in advance. – BulBul Apr 24 '14 at 11:49
    
I'm sorry but I always work with base vectors and construct the matrix from them. In this case each object has 3 vectors FORWARD, UP, POSITION (and RIGHT is cross product of FORWARD and UP). This way you can always directly call look at or rather just apply these 4 vector coordinates into each row (RIGHT, UP, FORWARD, POSITION in row order). Then all the rotations and translations are very easy. Move forward is POSITION+=FORWARD*inputScale, rest are the same. Rotations are then simply rotating 2 base vectors around the 3rd (rotating FORWARD and RIGHT around UP will turn right). – Matic Oblak Apr 24 '14 at 14:20
    
I modified the code a little in accordance to your suggestion and it worked, you may check my answer/solution i wrote and may add it to yours so people can see it, thanks for your help. – BulBul Apr 24 '14 at 19:04

my code seemed to ignore the previous matrix calculation and re calculated the transformations with respect to my scene's initial state, the desired world rotation & Translation is achieved by using a fixed value for rotation & Translation, the modified code blocks are as follows:

      for (int x = 0; x< 256; x++)
        {
            if (state[x] == 1 )
            {
                if(x  == 26)
                    tranForward = -0.001;
                if (x == 22)
                    tranForward = 0.001;
                if (x == 4)
                    tranRight = 0.0009;
                if (x == 7)
                    tranRight = -0.0009;

                if (x == 82)
                    lookUp = 0.02;
                if (x == 81)
                    lookUp = -0.02;
                if (x == 80)
                    lookRight = -0.02;
                if (x == 79)
                    lookRight = 0.02;
            }
        }

camTrans   =   Rotation.setRotation(lookUp, lookRight, 0) * Translation.setTranslation(tranRight, 0, tranForward);

        result =   camTrans * result;

        modelTrans = Projection * result;



        tranForward = 0.0;
        tranRight   = 0.0;
        lookUp      = 0.0;
        lookRight   = 0.0;

       glUniformMatrix4fv(uniformloc, 1, GL_TRUE, modelTrans.getMat());

note that result matrix keeps track of the previous state and the current state transformations are applied with respect to it.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.