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I've tried (with success) to do an http request. I have some REST Api's, like graph.facebook.com as target. The functionality is the same. When i make an HTTP request with node.js as a simple program i can do it. Really i want to make a little module, and i have this code:

// file: facebook.js
var http = require('http');

var Facebook = (function() {
  function Facebook(access_token) {
    this.access_token = access_token;
  }

  Facebook.prototype.getObject = function(id) {
    var options;
    this.id = id;
    options = {
      host: 'graph.facebook.com',
      port: 80,
      path: '/' + id + '?access_token=' + this.access_token
    };
    return http.request(options, function(response) {
      response.on('data', function(d) {
        return JSON.parse(d);
      });
      request.end();
      return request.on('error', function(err) {
        return {
          error: 'An error ocurred.'
        };
      });
    });
  };

  return Facebook;

})();

module.exports = Facebook;

After, when i write a program i can do this:

var facebook = require('./facebook.js');
var fb = facebook('my_Access_token')
// Here's the problem:
var response = fb.getObject('My_facebook_profile_ID')

I get a response like

{ domain: null,
  _events: 
   { response: { [Function: g] listener: [Function] },
     socket: { [Function: g] listener: [Function] } },
....

When i must have something like

{
   "id": "MyIDNumer",    
   "first_name": "Orlando",
   "gender": "male",
   "last_name": "Sanchez",
   "link": "https://www.facebook.com/MyFacebookName",
   "locale": "es_LA",
   "name": "Orlando S\u00e1nchez",
   "username": "MyUsername"
}

What can i do?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

The first thing you should do is rewrite the module to not use the same function name twice ('Facebook').

Secondly, there's no need for the closure, just export the constructor.

Thirdly, you are trying to return a value from an asynchronous callback. This particular issue is common with people coming from the synchronous world.

Assuming you wanted to do a GET request, here's your module refactored after the above and other things are fixed:

// file: facebook.js
var http = require('http');


function Facebook(access_token) {
  if (!(this instanceof Facebook))
    return new Facebook(access_token);
  this.access_token = access_token;
}

Facebook.prototype.getObject = function(id, cb) {
  var options;
  this.id = id;
  options = {
    host: 'graph.facebook.com',
    port: 80,
    path: '/' + id + '?access_token=' + this.access_token
  };
  http.get(options, function(res) {
    var buf = '',
        hadError = false;
    res.on('data', function(d) {
      buf += d;
    }).on('error', function(err) {
      hadError = true;
      cb(err);
    }).on('end', function() {
      if (hadError)
        return;
      var val;
      try {
        val = JSON.parse(buf);
      } catch (err) {
        return cb(err);
      }
      cb(null, val);
    });
  });
};

module.exports = Facebook;

Then use it like so:

var facebook = require('./facebook.js');
var fb = facebook('my_Access_token');
fb.getObject('My_facebook_profile_ID', function(err, response) {
  if (err) {
    // include better error handling here
    return console.log(err);
  }
  // use response here
  console.dir(response);
});
share|improve this answer
    
I'm a noob in the Async world, you're right. And i have used CoffeScript to do the little module i show up. I'll study some of that. And thank you, i think your response is more useful than my code. –  Orlando Apr 23 '14 at 2:06
    
That particular pattern of using the same name twice is common and not at all dangerous - they end up referring to the same thing, so nothing about it is at all ambiguous. The IIFE allows you to have something akin to private static variables in more traditional OO languages, so I would definitely not give it up. It is also generated by CoffeeScript, so you would have to work way around the language to get rid of it. –  Aaron Dufour Apr 23 '14 at 3:26
    
Sure, but if you aren't using any "private" variables, it's useless and looks confusing. The only other time you'd need the closure is to keep from polluting the global space, but that's only for browser environments and not node. –  mscdex Apr 23 '14 at 3:40

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