Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm pretty confused about the output of the following code:

public class Cat {

    public String typeCode = "Cat";
    public String toString(){
        return "Cat";
    }

    public static void printTypes(Cat c1, Cat c2){
        System.out.println(c1.typeCode + " " + c2.typeCode);
    }

    public static void main(String[] args){
        Cat c1 = new Cat();
        SubCat s1 = new SubCat();
        Cat c2 = s1;

        System.out.println(s1.typeCode);
        Cat.printTypes(c1, s1);
        SubCat.printTypes(c1, s1);
        SubCat.printTypes(c2, c1);
        SubCat.printTypes(c1, c2);
        System.out.println(c2 + " " + c1);

    }
}

public class SubCat extends Cat{
    public String typeCode = "SubCat";
    public String toString(){
        return "SubCat";
    }

    public static void printTypes(Cat c1, Cat c2){
        System.out.println(c1 + " " +c2.typeCode);
    }

}

Eclipse gives me this output:

SubCat
Cat Cat
Cat Cat
SubCat Cat
Cat Cat
SubCat Cat

But in my opinion, I think the second and the third lines should be

Cat SubCat
Cat SubCat

Since s1 is a subcat and its typecode is SubCat, so why the output is a Cat?

And also, what would happen after this line: Cat c2 = s1? Does this mean s1 and c2 would then be exactly the same object or s1 and c2 would just have the same reference or address in the RAM? Is c2 a Cat or SubCat and would s1 be changed to a subcat?

Thanks in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Please indicate the language (java) by adding a tag for it, rather than putting it in the title. I've fixed it this time. –  Blorgbeard Apr 23 '14 at 2:43

1 Answer 1

You have two different typeCode fields; one on each class.
Creating a field with the same name in the derived class does not affect the field defined in the base class.

To get the behavior you're expecting, you should remove the duplicate field definition in the derived class, and instead assign to the original field in the derived constructor.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.