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I am trying to use a FOR loop to iterate over IP addresses (in a bash array), logs in, runs a script and then exits. The array is called ${INSTANCE_IPS[@]}. The following code doesn't work though, as expect doesn't seem to be able to accept the variable $instance.

for instance in ${INSTANCE_IPS[@]}
  do
  echo $instance
  /usr/bin/expect -c '
  spawn ssh root@$instance;
  expect "?assword: ";
  send "<password>\r";
  expect "# ";
  send ". /usr/local/bin/bootstrap.sh\r";
  expect "# ";
  send "exit\r" '
done

However, expect complains with:

can't read "instance": no such variable
    while executing
"spawn ssh root@$instance"

There is another question on stackoverflow located here, that uses environmental variables to achieve this, however it doesn't allow me to iterate through different IP addresses like I can in an array.

Any help is appreciated.

Cheers

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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem is with quoting. Single quotes surrounding the whole block don't let Bash expand variables ($instance).

You need to switch to double quotes. But then, double quotes inside double quotes are not allowed (unless you escape them), so we are better off using single quotes with expect strings.

Try instead:

for instance in ${INSTANCE_IPS[@]}
  do
  echo $instance
  /usr/bin/expect -c "
  spawn ssh root@$instance;
  expect '?assword: ';
  send '<password>\r';
  expect '# ';
  send '. /usr/local/bin/bootstrap.sh\r';
  expect '# ';
  send 'exit\r' "
done
share|improve this answer
    
Ah yes you're right. Works now, thanks :) –  user3558925 Apr 23 '14 at 3:30
    
I actually needed to comment out thge "s, as it wasn't interpreting the \r character. All working now. Cheers –  user3558925 Apr 23 '14 at 3:47
for instance in ${INSTANCE_IPS[&]} ;  do
    echo $instance
    /usr/bin/expect -c '
    spawn ssh root@'$instance' "/usr/local/bin/bootstrap.sh"
    expect "password:"
    send "<password>\r"
    expect eof'
done

From the ssh man page:

If command is specified, it is executed on the remote host instead of a login shell.

Specifying a command means expect doesn't have to wait for # to execute your program, then wait for another # just to send the command exit. Instead, when you specify a command to ssh, it executes that command; it exits when done; and then ssh automatically closes the connection.

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Alternately, put the value in the environment and expect can find it there

for instance in ${INSTANCE_IPS[&]} ;  do
    echo $instance
    the_host=$instance /usr/bin/expect -c '
        spawn ssh root@$env(the_host) ...
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