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I have two large (~100 GB) text files that must be iterated through simultaneously.

Zip works well for smaller files but I found out that it's actually making a list of lines from my two files. This means that every line gets stored in memory. I don't need to do anything with the lines more than once.

handle1 = open('filea', 'r'); handle2 = open('fileb', 'r')

for i, j in zip(handle1, handle2):
    do something with i and j.
    write to an output file.
    no need to do anything with i and j after this.

Is there an alternative to zip() that acts as a generator that will allow me to iterate through these two files without using >200GB of ram?

share|improve this question
    
... actually, I know of one way but it doesn't seem very pythonic - while line1: line1 = handle1.readline(); line2 = handle2.readline(); do something with line1 and line2... –  Austin Feb 24 '10 at 3:07
    
Speaking of memory constrained environments you might find this interesting neopythonic.blogspot.com/2008/10/… –  Cristian Ciupitu Feb 24 '10 at 3:40

4 Answers 4

up vote 18 down vote accepted

itertools has a function izip that does that

from itertools import izip
for i, j in izip(handle1, handle2):
    ...

If the files are of different sizes you may use izip_longest, as izip will stop at the smaller file.

share|improve this answer

You can use izip_longest like this to pad the shorter file with empty lines

in python 2.6

from itertools import izip_longest
with handle1 as open('filea', 'r'):
    with handle2 as open('fileb', 'r'): 
        for i, j in izip_longest(handle1, handle2, fillvalue=""):
            ...

or in python3.1

from itertools import izip_longest
with handle1 as open('filea', 'r'), handle2 as open('fileb', 'r'): 
    for i, j in izip_longest(handle1, handle2, fillvalue=""):
        ...
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for with - I like the Py3.1 syntax to keep down the indent levels. –  Paul McGuire Feb 24 '10 at 4:06

If you want to truncate to the shortest file:

handle1 = open('filea', 'r')
handle2 = open('fileb', 'r')

try:
    while 1:
        i = handle1.next()
        j = handle2.next()

        do something with i and j.
        write to an output file.

except StopIteration:
    pass

finally:
    handle1.close()
    handle2.close()

Else

handle1 = open('filea', 'r')
handle2 = open('fileb', 'r')

i_ended = False
j_ended = False
while 1:
    try:
        i = handle1.next()
    except StopIteration:
        i_ended = True
    try:
        j = handle2.next()
    except StopIteration:
        j_ended = True

        do something with i and j.
        write to an output file.
    if i_ended and j_ended:
        break

handle1.close()
handle2.close()

Or

handle1 = open('filea', 'r')
handle2 = open('fileb', 'r')

while 1:
    i = handle1.readline()
    j = handle2.readline()

    do something with i and j.
    write to an output file.

    if not i and not j:
        break
handle1.close()
handle2.close()
share|improve this answer
    
And if the two files are different lengths? This will truncate at the shorter one. Hopefully, that's the desired behavior. –  S.Lott Feb 24 '10 at 3:17
    
@S.Lott: isn't that what zip does? –  voyager Feb 24 '10 at 3:32
    
@S.Lott - this only breaks out of the while-forever loop when both i_ended AND j_ended, so it will read until the end of the longer file. But there is definitely room for improvement. If one file is much shorter than the other, the current code will call .next() and catch StopIteration many times, when we have already learned that the file has ended. Simple enough to do: if not i_ended: try: i=handel1.next() ... (as you do in your if if1_more: code). (Ah! I see that your comment was responding to the original code, not the edited version - sorry for butting in!) –  Paul McGuire Feb 24 '10 at 3:38
1  
@voyager - no your second version is actually worse. First, read() reads the entire file, I think you meant readline(). When at the end of the file, readline() returns an empty string. Second, your loop exiting code should not call readline() again, as this will destructively read another line from the input file. Instead, you should do if not i and not j: break or if not i or not j: break, depending on whether you want to stop at the shorter file or not. And I'm surprised to see i and j used for strings, convention says these would be integer loop indexes. Why not line1 and line2? –  Paul McGuire Feb 24 '10 at 3:56
1  
Yes, I believe readline() internally does some I/O readahead buffering to optimize I/O performance, but only returns one line at a time, and does not read the entire file. This can sometimes be confused with readlines(), which does read the entire file into a list of newline-terminated strings. –  Paul McGuire Feb 24 '10 at 4:56

Something like this? Wordy, but it seems to be what you're asking for.

It can be adjusted to do things like a proper merge to match keys between the two files, which is often more what's needed than the simplistic zip function. Also, this doesn't truncate, which is what the SQL OUTER JOIN algorithm does, again, different from what zip does and more typical of files.

with open("file1","r") as file1:
    with open( "file2", "r" as file2:
        for line1, line2 in parallel( file1, file2 ):
            process lines

def parallel( file1, file2 ):
    if1_more, if2_more = True, True
    while if1_more or if2_more:
        line1, line2 = None, None # Assume simplistic zip-style matching
        # If you're going to compare keys, then you'd do that before
        # deciding what to read.
        if if1_more:
            try:
                line1= file1.next()
            except StopIteration:
                if1_more= False
        if if2_more:
            try:
                line2= file2.next()
            except StopIteration:
                if2_more= False
        yield line1, line2
share|improve this answer
3  
Did you not mean 'while if1_more OR if2_more:'? And why wrap file1 and file2 in iters, when files are already iters? And lastly, was this just an academic "how would I do this for myself if I had to?" exercise? Surely one would prefer to use izip or izip_longest from the itertools module in the std lib, instead of writing 20 lines of homebrewed code that does the same thing, but would have to be maintained and supported (and debugged!). –  Paul McGuire Feb 24 '10 at 3:35
    
@Paul McGuire: Yes, OR is correct. The explicit iter is required to use next and get a proper StopIteraction exception at EOF. No this was not "academic". This is an answer to the question. The question is vague and itertools may not provide the required features. This may not either, but this can be tailored. –  S.Lott Feb 24 '10 at 3:43
    
I'm running Py2.5.4, and calling next() on a file object at the end of the file raises StopIteration for me. –  Paul McGuire Feb 24 '10 at 4:01
    
@Paul: Good enough. I didn't bother testing it, but jotted it down from memory. –  S.Lott Feb 24 '10 at 11:01

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