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// Cannot change source code
class Base
{
    public virtual void Say()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Called from Base.");
    }
}

// Cannot change source code
class Derived : Base
{
    public override void Say()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Called from Derived.");
        base.Say();
    }
}

class SpecialDerived : Derived
{
    public override void Say()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Called from Special Derived.");
        base.Say();
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        SpecialDerived sd = new SpecialDerived();
        sd.Say();
    }
}

The result is:

Called from Special Derived.
Called from Derived. /* this is not expected */
Called from Base.

How can I rewrite SpecialDerived class so that middle class "Derived"'s method is not called?

UPDATE: The reason why I want to inherit from Derived instead of Base is Derived class contains a lot of other implementations. Since I can't do base.base.method() here, I guess the best way is to do the following?

// Cannot change source code

class Derived : Base
{
    public override void Say()
    {
        CustomSay();

        base.Say();
    }

    protected virtual void CustomSay()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Called from Derived.");
    }
}

class SpecialDerived : Derived
{
    /*
    public override void Say()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Called from Special Derived.");
        base.Say();
    }
    */

    protected override void CustomSay()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Called from Special Derived.");
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
Editing to match your update. –  JoshJordan Feb 24 '10 at 4:39
    

5 Answers 5

This is a bad programming practice, and not allowed in C#. It's a bad programming practice because

  • The details of the grandbase are implementation details of the base; you shouldn't be relying on them. The base class is providing an abstraction overtop of the grandbase; you should be using that abstraction, not building a bypass to avoid it.

  • You derived from your base because you like what it does and want to reuse and extend it. If you don't like what it does and want to work around it rather than work with it, then why did you derive from it in the first place? Derive from the grandbase yourself if that's the functionality you want to use and extend.

  • The base might require certain invariants for security or semantic consistency purposes that are maintained by the details of how the base uses the methods of the grandbase. Allowing a derived class of the base to skip the code that maintains those invariants could put the base into an inconsistent, corrupted state.

share|improve this answer
1  
On the topic of security, it should be noted that you cannot guarantee that callers will call the most-derived version of a virtual function. –  rh. Feb 24 '10 at 18:06
1  
@rh: yes, that is a good point. Hostile code does not need to obey the rules of C#. –  Eric Lippert Feb 24 '10 at 18:27
2  
@rh: In fact, it was worse before .NET 2.0; it used to be legal in IL to call overridden methods on a base class even if the calling class wasn't derived from it. See research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/akenn/sec/appsem-tcs.pdf for comments on how this and other IL/C# mismatches affect the security of C# code. –  kvb Feb 24 '10 at 19:52
    
+1 OOP is meant exactly to reuse a basic behaviour from a base class. If one rather do what the base.base class does, then derive from it, instead of deriving from its derived. =) –  Will Marcouiller Feb 25 '10 at 14:49
    
@kvb: Excellent point. In fact this change was make right before 2.0 shipped, and it broke verifiability of base calls in anonymous methods in C#. As you note, the verifier checks that the call site is derived from the type declaring the method; it does not check if the call site is contained within the type declaring the method! Fortunately the code generator now does the right thing, at long last, and we have eliminated the "base call is not verifiable" warning. –  Eric Lippert Feb 25 '10 at 17:51

You can't from C#. From IL, this is actually supported. You can do a non-virt call to any of your parent classes... but please don't. :)

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The answer (which I know is not what you're looking for) is:

class SpecialDerived : Base
{
    public override void Say()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Called from Special Derived.");
        base.Say();
    }
}

The truth is, you only have direct interaction with the class you inherit from. Think of that class as a layer - providing as much or as little of it or its parent's functionality as it desires to its derived classes.

EDIT:

Your edit works, but I think I would use something like this:

class Derived : Base
{
    protected bool _useBaseSay = false;

    public override void Say()
    {
        if(this._useBaseSay)
            base.Say();
        else
            Console.WriteLine("Called from Derived");
    }
}

Of course, in a real implementation, you might do something more like this for extensibility and maintainability:

class Derived : Base
{
    protected enum Mode
    {
        Standard,
        BaseFunctionality,
        Verbose
        //etc
    }

    protected Mode Mode
    {
        get; set;
    }

    public override void Say()
    {
        if(this.Mode == Mode.BaseFunctionality)
            base.Say();
        else
            Console.WriteLine("Called from Derived");
    }
}

Then, derived classes can control their parents' state appropriately.

share|improve this answer
1  
Why not just write a protected function in Derived which calls Base.Say, so that it can be called from SpecialDerived? Simpler, no? –  nawfal May 2 at 16:16

You can also make a simple function in first level derived class, to call grand base function

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In cases where you do not have access to the derived class source, but need all the source of the derived class besides the current method, then I would recommended you should also do a derived class and call the implementation of the derived class.

Here is an example:

//No access to the source of the following classes
public class Base
{
     public virtual void method1(){ Console.WriteLine("In Base");}
}
public class Derived : Base
{
     public override void method1(){ Console.WriteLine("In Derived");}
     public void method2(){ Console.WriteLine("Some important method in Derived");}
}

//Here should go your classes
//First do your own derived class
public class MyDerived : Base
{         
}

//Then derive from the derived class 
//and call the bass class implementation via your derived class
public class specialDerived : Derived
{
     public override void method1()
     { 
          MyDerived md = new MyDerived();
          //This is actually the base.base class implementation
          MyDerived.method1();  
     }         
}
share|improve this answer

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