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I want to write a function which return an array which contain a for loop that enumerates some value I want to store them in to an array. I tried this

public int[] a()
{
   int[] b=new int []{};

   for(int i=0;i<10;i++) 
   {
       b[i]=i   {Index out of range exception comes}
   } 

   return b;
} 

I don't like to use enumerable.range() because of performance issue. I want to keep the array size empty.

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what language? (also, is your <tab> key broken or missing from your keyboard?) –  The Paramagnetic Croissant Apr 23 at 5:46
4  
What performance issue do you think Enumerable.Range has, and why? You can't "keep the array size empty" if you want to store anything in it, that doesn't make sense. –  Blorgbeard Apr 23 at 5:48
    
ok is there any way to store for loop value in array –  chand Apr 23 at 5:52
    
a for loop is a statement not an expression and thus has no value –  Rune FS Apr 23 at 6:02
    
Enumerable.Range returns an IEnumerable which is not evaluated until you start iterating over it (or call ToArray or similar). That's sort of "storing for loop in array". You could say var a = Enumerable.Range(0,100000), and only a few bytes of memory would be used, until you called ToArray(), of course. –  Blorgbeard Apr 23 at 6:06

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In your case you need an array with 10 elements in it. In some languages you could do what you are trying to do (JavaScript being one). Let's assume you could extend an array in C# then your code would allocate space for one element at a time in each iteration of the loop resulting in the allocation of 10 elements. Optimally this would be as fast as allocating 10 elements in one go. However that's probably unlikely and it's never going to be faster than requesting once for all of them to be allocated. So in other words there's no performance gain to be found by not simply allocating all 10 elements in one go

public int[] a()
{
   int[] b=new int [10];

   for(int i=0;i<b.Length;i++) 
   {
       b[i]=i;
   } 
   return b;
}

However a much more readable approach would be

public int[] a()
{
    return Enumerable.Range(0,10).ToArray();
}
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int[] b=new int []{}; means your array b[] is zero length. You get an index out of range exception on b[i]=i because there are no elements. You're effectively doing b[0]=0 but element 0 does not exist.

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