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I'm implementing an interface that has a member IEnumerable<BaseClass> Member. But I'd like to store some extra information in each BaseClass item, for which I've created a derived class. This is what I'd like to be able to do:

interface IImplementMe
{
    IEnumerable<BaseClass> Member { get; }
}

class DerivedClass : BaseClass
{
    // Some extra stuff here
}

class Implementation : IImplementMe
{
    IEnumerable<DerivedClass> Member { get; }
}

I don't think there's a way to do this (if there is please let me know!). There may be repeated items in the Member list, so I cannot use a dictionary to store the extra stuff. What would it be the standard, elegant way to achieve this?

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Just because two types, T1 and T2 have an inheritance relationship, that doesn't mean that G<T1> and G<T2> (where G is a generic type with one type argument) have the same inheritance relationship. In fact, they have no inheritance relationship. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Apr 23 at 7:42
    
Interfaces cannot have fields, so does the property have a getter and a setter or only a getter? –  mike z Apr 23 at 7:43
    
@mikez There you go. –  Juan Luis Soldi Apr 23 at 7:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You can use explicit interface implementations for this.

class Implementation : IImplementMe
{
    public IEnumerable<DerivedClass> Member;

    IEnumerable<BaseClass> IImplementMe.Member { get { return Member; } }
}
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@PatrickHofman Sure this will work, assuming one fixes the compilation errors. This is a standard way to do it. –  mike z Apr 23 at 7:48
    
@mikez: Sorry, you are right. I didn't expect the cast to work, but since it is an interface, it will work. –  Patrick Hofman Apr 23 at 7:54
    
Yes! This is because IEnumerable is IEnumerable<out T> isn't it? –  Juan Luis Soldi Apr 23 at 7:57
    
@PatrickHofman Well, I guess technically it will work only when compiling to .NET 4 or higher. That was when generic variance was introduced. –  mike z Apr 23 at 7:59
    
@mikez: Then I missed that feature. I remembered this didn't work, but now it does. Thanks for the heads up! –  Patrick Hofman Apr 23 at 8:01

You have two options I think:

  1. Use the derived class as type parameter:

    interface IImplementMe<T> where T : BaseClass
    {
        IEnumerable<T> Member;
    }
    
    class DerivedClass : BaseClass
    {
        // Some extra stuff here
    }
    
    class Implementation : IImplementMe<DerivedClass>
    {
        IEnumerable<DerivedClass> Member;
    }
    
  2. Use IEnumerable:

    interface IImplementMe
    {
        IEnumerable Member;
    }
    
    class DerivedClass : BaseClass
    {
        // Some extra stuff here
    }
    
    class Implementation : IImplementMe
    {
        IEnumerable Member;
    }
    
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