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the below script is basically catching the second column and counting the values. The only minor issue I have is that the file has empty lines at the end (it's how the values are being exported) and because of these empty lines the script is miscounting. Any ideas please? Thanks.

my $sum_column_b = 0;
open my $file, "<", "file_to_count.txt" or die($!);

while( my $line = <$file>) {
    $line =~ m/\s+(\d+)/; #regexpr to catch second column values
    $sum_column_b += $1;
}
print $sum_column_b, "\n";
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If there is no match, $1 will retain the previous value. The better way to write it would be if ($line =~ m/\s+(\d+)/) { $sum_column_b += $1; } –  szabgab Apr 23 '14 at 8:32

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I think the main issue has been established, you are using $1 when it is not conditionally tied to the regex match, which causes you to add values when you should not. This is an alternative solution:

$sum_column_b += $1 if $line =~ m/\s+(\d+)/;

Typically, you should never use $1 unless you check that the regex you expect it to come from succeeded. Use either something like this:

if ($line =~ /(\d+)/) {
     $sum += $1;
}

Or use direct assignment to a variable:

my ($num) = $line =~ /(\d+)/;
$sum += $num;

Note that you need to use list context by adding parentheses around the variable, or the regex will simply return 1 for success. Also note that, like Borodin says, this will give an undefined value when the match fails, and you must add code to check for that.

This can be handy when capturing several values:

my @nums = $line =~ /(\d+)/g;
share|improve this answer
    
Your list assignment to $num ignores the point you made about checking whether the pattern match succeeded. If there were no digits in the string your program would generate a warning something like Use of uninitialized value in addition. It's a strange choice to use no warnings 'uninitialized' instead of just checking the status of the match –  Borodin Apr 23 '14 at 11:34
    
I added that to show an alternate method in the generic case, but yes, it is not the best method in this particular case, because it gives a warning. It will not change the sum, however, and the value will be appropriate for the given input line. –  TLP Apr 23 '14 at 19:53

The main problem is that if the regex does not match, then $1 will hold the value it received in the previous successful match. So every empty line will cause the previous line to be counted again.

An improvement would be:

my $sum_column_b = 0;
open my $file, "<", "file_to_count.txt" or die($!);

while( my $line = <$file>) {
    next if $line =~ /^\s*$/;  # skip "empty" lines 
    # ... maybe skip other known invalid lines

    if ($line =~ m/\s+(\d+)/) { #regexpr to catch second column values
        $sum_column_b += $1;
    } else {
        warn "problematic line '$line'\n"; # report invalid lines
   }
}
print $sum_column_b, "\n";

The else-block is of course optional but can help noticing invalid data.

share|improve this answer
    
next if $line =~ /^\s*$/ is better written next unless $line =~ /\S/ –  Borodin Apr 23 '14 at 11:38
    
unless you don't like unless –  szabgab Apr 23 '14 at 11:52
    
No, it's better that way regardless of whether you like it or not –  Borodin Apr 23 '14 at 11:58
    
Hmm, care to explain why do you think it is better? –  szabgab Apr 23 '14 at 12:03
    
It's cleaner and less noisy, and it's far more obvious what the statement does. "skip this line unless it has a non-space character" is much clearer than "skip this line if it consists of zero or more space characters from beginning to end" –  Borodin Apr 23 '14 at 12:15

Try putting this line just after the while line:

next if ( $line =~ /^$/ );

Basically, loop around to the next line if the current line has no content.

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#!/usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

my $sum_column_b = 0;
open my $file, "<", "file_to_count.txt" or die($!);

while (my $line = <$file>) {
  next if (m/^\s*$/); # next line if this is unsignificant
  if ($line =~ m/\s+(\d+)/) {
    $sum_column_b += $1;
  }
}
print "$sum_column_b\n";
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