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Suppose I have a table with a numeric column (lets call it "score").

I'd like to generate a table of counts, that shows how many times scores appeared in each range.

For example:

score range  | number of occurrences
-------------------------------------
   0-9       |        11
  10-19      |        14
  20-29      |         3
   ...       |       ...

In this example there were 11 rows with scores in the range of 0 to 9, 14 rows with scores in the range of 10 to 19, and 3 rows with scores in the range 20-29.

Is there an easy way to set this up? What do you recommend?

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11 Answers 11

up vote 63 down vote accepted

Neither of the highest voted answers are correct on SQLServer 2000. Perhaps they were using a different version.

Here are the correct versions of both of them on SQLServer 2000.

select t.range as [score range], count(*) as [number of occurences]
from (
  select case  
    when score between 0 and 9 then ' 0- 9'
    when score between 10 and 19 then '10-19'
    else '20-99' end as range
  from scores) t
group by t.range

or

select t.range as [score range], count(*) as [number of occurences]
from (
      select user_id,
         case when score >= 0 and score< 10 then '0-9'
         when score >= 10 and score< 20 then '10-19'
         else '20-99' end as range
     from scores) t
group by t.range
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Can i aggregate another column as well (like group counts). say i wana aggregate the scholarship column for each score range. I tried, but not getting it right –  Munish Goyal May 10 '11 at 7:05
    
Nice answer @Ron Tuffin, however when you have two ranges like 10-20 , 100-200, then the order does not work. you would have order like 10-20, 100-200,20-30 etc. Any tip for the order by? –  Damien Joe Mar 26 at 5:22

I see answers here that won't work in SQL Server's syntax. I would use:

select t.range as [score range], count(*) as [number of occurences]
from (
  select case 
    when score between  0 and  9 then ' 0-9 '
    when score between 10 and 19 then '10-19'
    when score between 20 and 29 then '20-29'
    ...
    else '90-99' end as range
  from scores) t
group by t.range

EDIT: see comments

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It is possibly because of the version of SQLServer I am using but to get your example to work (I test things before I vote them up) I had to move 'score' from after the 'case' to after each 'when'. –  Ron Tuffin Oct 24 '08 at 11:50
2  
You're right, and thanks for the correction. Apparently when you put the variable after the keyword 'case', you can only do exact matches, not expressions. I learn as much from answering questions as from asking them. :-) –  Ken Paul Oct 28 '08 at 23:19

An alternative approach would involve storing the ranges in a table, instead of embedding them in the query. You would end up with a table, call it Ranges, that looks like this:

LowerLimit   UpperLimit   Range 
0              9          '0-9'
10            19          '10-19'
20            29          '20-29'
30            39          '30-39'

And a query that looks like this:

Select
   Range as [Score Range],
   Count(*) as [Number of Occurences]
from
   Ranges r inner join Scores s on s.Score between r.LowerLimit and r.UpperLimit
group by Range

This does mean setting up a table, but it would be easy to maintain when the desired ranges change. No code changes necessary!

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Clear and Simple ! ++ –  RicardoBalda Dec 12 '10 at 0:44

In postgres (where || is the string concatenation operator):

select (score/10)*10 || '-' || (score/10)*10+9 as scorerange, count(*)
from scores
group by score/10
order by 1

gives:

 scorerange | count 
------------+-------
 0-9        |    11
 10-19      |    14
 20-29      |     3
 30-39      |     2
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James Curran's answer was the most concise in my opinion, but the output wasn't correct. For SQL Server the simplest statement is as follows:

SELECT 
    [score range] = CAST((Score/10)*10 AS VARCHAR) + ' - ' + CAST((Score/10)*10+9 AS VARCHAR), 
    [number of occurrences] = COUNT(*)
FROM #Scores
GROUP BY Score/10
ORDER BY Score/10

This assumes a #Scores temporary table I used to test it, I just populated 100 rows with random number between 0 and 99.

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Ah... There's the advantage of actually taking the time to create the table. (I used an existing table with too few rows over too small a range) –  James Curran Oct 24 '08 at 13:47
create table scores (
   user_id int,
   score int
)

select t.range as [score range], count(*) as [number of occurences]
from (
      select user_id,
         case when score >= 0 and score < 10 then '0-9'
         case when score >= 10 and score < 20 then '10-19'
         ...
         else '90-99' as range
     from scores) t
group by t.range
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! I tried this and the basic idea works great, although the syntax that I had to use is slightly different. Only the first "case" keyword is needed and then after the last condition, before the "as range" you need the keyword "end". Other than that, worked great- thanks! –  Hugh Oct 24 '08 at 4:05
select cast(score/10 as varchar) + '-' + cast(score/10+9 as varchar), 
       count(*)
from scores
group by score/10
share|improve this answer
    
I like this, but you have to fix up the ranges outside the query if you're going to display it. –  tvanfosson Oct 24 '08 at 3:35
    
In case you decide to fix your answer you need to change your score/10 on the first line to be (score/10)*10 for both of them otherwise you get 3 - 12 instead of 30-39 etc. As per my post below you could add an order by to get the results in the right order. –  Timothy Walters Oct 24 '08 at 5:57
declare @RangeWidth int

set @RangeWidth = 10

select
   Floor(Score/@RangeWidth) as LowerBound,
   Floor(Score/@RangeWidth)+@RangeWidth as UpperBound,
   Count(*)
From
   ScoreTable
group by
   Floor(Score/@RangeWidth)
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select t.blah as [score range], count(*) as [number of occurences]
from (
  select case 
    when score between  0 and  9 then ' 0-9 '
    when score between 10 and 19 then '10-19'
    when score between 20 and 29 then '20-29'
    ...
    else '90-99' end as blah
  from scores) t
group by t.blah

Make sure you use a word other than 'range' if you are in MySQL, or you will get an error for running the above example.

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Because the column being sorted on (Range) is a string, string/word sorting is used instead of numeric sorting.

As long as the strings have zeros to pad out the number lengths the sorting should still be semantically correct:

SELECT t.range AS ScoreRange,
       COUNT(*) AS NumberOfOccurrences
  FROM (SELECT CASE
                    WHEN score BETWEEN 0 AND 9 THEN '00-09'
                    WHEN score BETWEEN 10 AND 19 THEN '10-19'
                    ELSE '20-99'
               END AS Range
          FROM Scores) t
 GROUP BY t.Range

If the range is mixed, simply pad an extra zero:

SELECT t.range AS ScoreRange,
       COUNT(*) AS NumberOfOccurrences
  FROM (SELECT CASE
                    WHEN score BETWEEN 0 AND 9 THEN '000-009'
                    WHEN score BETWEEN 10 AND 19 THEN '010-019'
                    WHEN score BETWEEN 20 AND 99 THEN '020-099'
                    ELSE '100-999'
               END AS Range
          FROM Scores) t
 GROUP BY t.Range
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Perhaps you're asking about keeping such things going...

Of course you'll invoke a full table scan for the queries and if the table containing the scores that need to be tallied (aggregations) is large you might want a better performing solution, you can create a secondary table and use rules, such as on insert - you might look into it.

Not all RDBMS engines have rules, though!

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