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I got a view List.aspx that is bound to the class Kindergarten

In the controller:

public ActionResult List(int Id)
{
  Kindergarten k = (from k1 in _kindergartensRepository.Kindergartens
                    where k1.Id == Id
                    select k1).First();

  return View(k);
}

That works.

But this doesn't

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Post)]
public ActionResult Add(...)
{
  //...
  Kindergarten k = ...
  return RedirectToAction("List", k);
}

How should I redirect to the list view, passing k as the model?

Thanks!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 13 down vote accepted

I think you just need to call view like

return RedirectToAction("List", new {id});

with id you need to populate the Kindergarten.

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I don't believe ModelBinding exists when using RedirectToAction. Your best options, however, is to use the TempData collection to store the object, and retrieve it in the following action.

[AcceptVerbs(HttpVerbs.Post)]
public ActionResult Add(...)
{
  //...
  Kindergarten k = ...
  TempData["KG"] = k;
  return RedirectToAction("List");
}

In your List Action

public ActionResult List()
{

   Kindergarten k = (Kindergarten)TempData["KG"];
   // I assume you need to do some stuff here with the object, 
   // otherwise this action would be a waste as you can do this in the Add Action
  return View(k);
}

Note: TempData collection only holds object for a single subsequent redirect. Once you make any redirect from Add, TempData["KG"] will be null (unless you repopulate it)

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you shouldn't be using MVC like this. –  eaglestorm Sep 27 '13 at 5:58
    
What's wrong with using MVC like this? –  Omar Sep 27 '13 at 18:54
1  
It implies there is to much logic in your actions. Business logic should be in a separate layer (services) and your action should call this logic and then redirect to the appropriate view. You shouldn't get into a position where you need to do the above if your app is well designed. –  eaglestorm Sep 30 '13 at 2:15
1  
Storing objects in memory doesn't mean you're app is not well designed. There are use cases for this: stackoverflow.com/a/1664269/160823. It may not be ideal in this exact implementation, but it's not inherently incorrect to use. –  Omar Sep 30 '13 at 15:09

I'm not sure you want to call RedirectToAction because that will just cause k to be set again.

I think you want to call View and pass in the name of the view and your model.

return View("List", k);
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You're right (_ _;) Thanks! –  aximili Feb 24 '10 at 6:19
    
Oh but what if the view is on another controller? –  aximili Feb 24 '10 at 6:20
    
When its looking for a View, it'll check the View\Controller\ folder, if it doesn't find it there, it checks the Shared folder. If you want to access a view across multiple controllers, put it in the Shared folder. –  Brandon Feb 24 '10 at 6:22
    
Also, I haven't tested this, but I suppose you could also try giving it a direct path: return View("~/Views/Controller/List.ascx"). Although I believe using the shared folder is preferable. –  Brandon Feb 24 '10 at 6:23
2  
This is correct however the URL will still say Add, not List. –  friggle Oct 16 '13 at 21:37

As Brandon said, you probably want to use return View("List", Id) instead, but the problem you're having is that you're passing k, your model, to a method that accepts an int as its parameter.

Think of RedirectToAction as a method call.

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