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How do you run a cron job every minute only between office hours(10 am to 5pm)

I checked this thread Run a cron job every minute only on specific hours? but it doesn't answer my questions.

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up vote 5 down vote accepted

This should be correct:

* 10-16 * * 1-5 /path/to/my-script

So every single minute, between and including 10am and 5pm, every day in every month that is a day between and including monday to friday. Obviously "office hours" is a fuzzy expression, many people have other schedules ;-)

Unfortunately I fail to see an easy solution to get the script executed also exactly on 5pm...

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+1 for the office hours bit – Brian Agnew Apr 23 '14 at 11:49
    
@last sentence - the easiest solution would be to duplicate this line in crontab and change it to run only on 5:00pm ;-) – dragoste Apr 23 '14 at 12:33
    
@dragoste That certainly would be possible, though not exactly elegant. I decided against, since such an execution would be running outside the requested time, so I would assume it is not requested. But that is something that only the OP can decide :-) Thanks anyway! – arkascha Apr 23 '14 at 12:52
    
Thank you @BrianAgnew – Parag Apr 23 '14 at 13:07

It does,

Access your shell script and add the following

  * 10-17 * * *

This means run every min, between these hours, on every day, of every month etc

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* 10-16 * * * /path/to/executable/file argument_1 argument_2

Yes, you can define hours range.

Someone tried to edit my answer but as documentation says hours in range are inclusive http://team.macnn.com/drafts/crontab_defs.html so don't change 16 to 17.

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