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I wanted to make a program in Java that checks if src exists (if not to throw an FileNoot)
and to copy the contents of src.txt to des.txt
and to print the sizes of two files at the opening and the closing

The output is:

src.txt is in current directory
Before opening files:Size of src.txt:43 Bytes   Size of des.txt:0 Bytes
After closing files:Size of src.txt:43 Bytes    Size of des.txt:0 Bytes

After src.txt writes its contents in des.txt , des should be 43 bytes

First, I would like to ask if I can omit File declaration by writing

PrintWriter outStream = new PrintWriter(new FileWriter("des.txt")); 

And also if I need to close() both the files and the stream

Secondly,I would like to ask how to adapt the following switch case (system indepent newline)
In order to add a newline after the one read.


Thirdly,I would like to ask the importance of try/catch block while closing File
Terribly sorry for this type of question but In C there was no error handling(I think) close() was certain to work


I am sorry for these types of questions but I am a beginner in java

import java.io.*;
public class Main 
{
    public static void main()throws FileNotFoundException
    {

    File src = new File("src.txt");
    if(src.exists())
        System.out.println("src.txt is in current directory");
    else throw new FileNotFoundException("src.txt is not in current directory");

    BufferedReader inStream = null;
    PrintWriter outStream = null;
    try{
        File des = new File("des.txt");
        inStream = new BufferedReader(new FileReader(src));
        outStream = new PrintWriter(new FileWriter(des));

        System.out.print("Before opening files:Size of src.txt:"+src.length()+" Bytes\t");
        System.out.println("Size of des.txt:"+des.length()+" Bytes");
        int c;
        while((c = inStream.read()) != -1){
            switch(c){
                case ' ': outStream.write('@');
                          break;
                case '\r':
                case '\n':outStream.write('\n');
                          outStream.write('\n');
                          break;
                default:outStream.write(c);
            }
        }
        System.out.print("After closing files:Size of src.txt:"+src.length()+" Bytes\t");
        System.out.println("Size of des.txt:"+des.length()+" Bytes");

    } catch(IOException io) {
        System.out.println("Read/Write Error:"+io.toString());
    } finally {
        try{
                if (inStream != null) {
                inStream.close();
                }

                if (outStream != null) {
                outStream.close();
                }
        } catch (IOException io){
            System.out.println("Error while closing Files:"+io.toString());
        }   
    }
} 
}
share|improve this question
    
I don't get why in this oracle document docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/essential/io/charstreams.html there is no exception handling in finally block for close(); methods , yet my compiler complained when I omit the handling –  niCk Apr 23 at 12:29
    
Because their main method throws IOException. –  Tom G Apr 23 at 12:34
    
@TomG Clever Remark, however why close() a file fails in java, in C, it didn't need handling –  niCk Apr 23 at 12:35
    
@TomG FileNotFoundException is a sublass , If i write main() throws FileNotFoundException, IOException, is this correct? is there overlapping? –  niCk Apr 23 at 12:39
    
If you write throws IOException it will also throw FileNotFoundException for you. And it is not true that close() cannot fail in C. C simply does not represent failures as exceptions like Java does. –  Tom G Apr 23 at 12:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

1st question ->I would like to ask if I can omit File declaration by writing

PrintWriter outStream = new PrintWriter(new FileWriter("des.txt"));

yes you can do it as filewriter comes with below 5 ways

FileWriter(File file)
Constructs a FileWriter object given a File object.
FileWriter(File file, boolean append)
Constructs a FileWriter object given a File object.
FileWriter(FileDescriptor fd)
Constructs a FileWriter object associated with a file descriptor.
FileWriter(String fileName)
Constructs a FileWriter object given a file name.
FileWriter(String fileName, boolean append)
Constructs a FileWriter object given a file name with a boolean indicating whether or not to append the data written.
share|improve this answer
    
do I need to close() them both? (file and fileWriter) –  niCk Apr 23 at 12:46
    
Yes, you need to close if you want your system resources released back. –  Karibasappa G C Apr 23 at 12:49
    
That applies to the Buffer-type objects too? –  niCk Apr 23 at 12:49
    
A BufferedReader only be opened and closed but a File is never opened or closed, it just represents a path in the filesystem. –  Karibasappa G C Apr 23 at 12:51
    
So I need to close buffer writer/readers and their subsequent File reader/writes. Sorry for the question but when I wrote in C (Files are pointers handled with extreme attention) –  niCk Apr 23 at 12:53

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