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I've got a pretty simple little bit of code. It goes like this:

<html lang="en" xml:lang="en" xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">
<head>
    <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
    <title>Home Index Test</title>
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="reset.css" media="all">
    <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="styles.css" media="all">

<!--    <script type="text/javascript" src="view.js"></script> -->
</head>
<body>

<div id="wrapper">
    wrapper
    <div id="header">
        <div id="logo">
               <img src="kimchi_img/bibi_logo.jpg">
        </div>

        <div id="login_menu">
            <p>About  Contact | Sign In  Register </p>
        </div>
    </div>
</div>

</body>
</html>

Easy, right? A wrapper class to bundle everything up, a header chunk that holds a logo and a menu. But when I peer at it in Firebug, it acts like the wrapper class isn't holding anything. I know that in Firefox a div element has to contain something in order to show up. So I tried a little test—I put the word "wrapper" inside the wrapper class like you see above. Well, now it shows up, but it acts like "wrapper" is only a single line long. I feel like I've missed an important step in the process. Here's the relevant CSS:

#wrapper {
    clear:both;
    margin:0 auto;
    padding:0;
    width:960px;
}

#header{
    width:960px;
}

#logo{
    float:left;
    width: 380px;   
}

#login_menu{
    float:left;
    text-align: right;
    width:580px;
}

I've also got a reset.css purring in the back, but it didn't clear it up.

share|improve this question
    
try setting the height of your wrapper class –  Tony The Lion Feb 24 '10 at 8:15

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Whenever you have a container that holding floated elements, the container will collapse unless you specify an explicit overflow for the container. Add this to either #wrapper or #header:

overflow: hidden;

Now this will (of course) fail in IE6. To get around this bug, I usually add the following to rules:

-height: 1px;
-overflow: auto;

Here, I use the - hack to target IE6, but if you prefer not using hacks, simply move these two properties (without the hyphens) to a seperate stylesheet and link it by conditional comments.

share|improve this answer
    
You, sir, are a genius. I can't believe I forgot that. Ugh. Thanks a ton! –  GilloD Feb 24 '10 at 8:21
    
@GilloD: You are welcome. See my update on compatability if you expect users with antique software :) –  Jørn Schou-Rode Feb 24 '10 at 8:23
    
Good call. I was about to mention the same. –  oni-kun Feb 24 '10 at 8:26
    
Could you explain how it fails in IE initially? –  e100 Apr 14 '10 at 12:47
    
@elliot: overflow: hidden does not cause IE6 expand the container, with the result of all overflowing children being truncated. At least that how it looks to me when I am working with containers around floating elements. –  Jørn Schou-Rode Apr 14 '10 at 13:33

Another solution would be to add an empty div with

style="clear:both;"

at the bottom of the wrapper.

share|improve this answer
    
This might serve as a workaround in some cases, but not when you need the container to expand - eg. container has a background color or a click event handler. –  Jørn Schou-Rode Feb 24 '10 at 10:12
    
I got the container exapnded –  Renjith K N Feb 20 '13 at 12:43

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