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I have a numpy array results that looks like

[ 0.  2.  0.  0.  0.  0.  3.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  2.  0.  0.
  0.  0.  0.  1.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  1.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.
  0.  1.  1.  0.  0.  0.  0.  2.  0.  3.  1.  0.  0.  2.  2.  0.  0.  0.
  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  1.  1.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  2.  0.  0.  0.  0.
  0.  1.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.  3.  1.  0.  0.  0.  0.  0.
  0.  0.  0.  1.  0.  0.  0.  1.  2.  2.]

i would like to plot a histogram of it. I have tried

import matplotlib.pyplot as plt
plt.hist(results, bins=range(5))
plt.show()

This gives me a histogram with the x-axis labelled 0.0 0.5 1.0 1.5 2.0 2.5 3.0. 3.5 4.0.

I would for the x-axis to be labelled 0 1 2 3 instead with the labels in the center of each bar. How can you do that?

share|improve this question
    
Im not sure what you want. Do you want the bins centered around 1,2,3 (so around the integer instead of the 1.5, 2.5 values). Or do you want to label the bars with text or something? Because if I execute your command, my output is (array([ 4., 5., 1., 2.]), array([0, 1, 2, 3, 4]) (with different input values). So I have got different bins, or do I miss something? – Mathias711 Apr 23 '14 at 13:58
    
@Mathias711 The first bar is the number of 0s in results, the second the numbers of 1s (there are eleven of them), the third the number of 2s (there are eight of them) and the last one is the number of 3s (there are three of them). I would like the number 0 as a label under the middle of the first bar, the number 1 as a label under the middle of the second and so on. Is that clearer? – eleanora Apr 23 '14 at 14:01
    
So there are no problems with the binning, you just want to add labels to the bins? – Mathias711 Apr 23 '14 at 14:02
    
@Mathias711 Yes I want to get rid of the default labels and add the ones I described. – eleanora Apr 23 '14 at 14:03
up vote 3 down vote accepted

you can build a bar plot out of a np.histogram.

Consider this

his = np.histogram(a,bins=range(5))
fig, ax = plt.subplots()
offset = .4
plt.bar(his[1][1:],his[0])
ax.set_xticks(his[1][1:] + offset)
ax.set_xticklabels( ('1', '2', '3', '4') )

enter image description here

EDIT: in order to get the bars touching one another, one has to play with the width parameter.

 fig, ax = plt.subplots()
 offset = .5
 plt.bar(his[1][1:],his[0],width=1)
 ax.set_xticks(his[1][1:] + offset)
 ax.set_xticklabels( ('1', '2', '3', '4') )

enter image description here

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! How do you get rid of the spaces between the bars? – eleanora Apr 23 '14 at 14:13
    
Ahh thanks. I was also working on something like this, only didnt get the xticks working. Thanks for clarifying – Mathias711 Apr 23 '14 at 14:15
    
@eleanora, bars have been fixed. – Acorbe Apr 23 '14 at 14:18
    
Also, how do I create ('0', '1', '2','3') if I wanted it to go from 0 to 100, say? tuple(str(i) for i in range(101)) ? – eleanora Apr 23 '14 at 14:18
2  
@eleanora That works, but I would use np.arange(1, 101).astype(str), or without numpy: map(str, range(1, 101)) – askewchan Apr 23 '14 at 16:40

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